tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-69729645193826060432013-10-24T17:16:23.244-04:00South End HistoryThe Blog of the South End Historical SocietyHope Shannonnoreply@blogger.comBlogger25125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-15166141951572798432013-08-13T11:44:00.001-04:002013-08-13T11:44:59.211-04:00The SEHS From an Intern's Perspective<div class="p1"><i>Maisie O’Malley is a Master’s candidate in Loyola University Chicago’s Public History program.&nbsp; Public historians study and practice the presentation of historical knowledge to general audiences.&nbsp; In this post, she reflects on her time spent as a summer intern at SEHS:</i></div><div class="p2"><span class="s1"></span><br /></div><div class="p1"><span class="s1">It’s Treh-mont, not Tree-mont.&nbsp;&nbsp;I still catch myself mispronouncing this iconic street’s name even after spending the summer living and working in the South End.&nbsp;&nbsp;I moved to Boston from Chicago in late May with no preconceptions about the South End.&nbsp; I walked around the neighborhood, immediately fell in love with the row houses, and started my internship at the South End Historical Society expecting to put my year’s-worth of graduate study to use being a Public Historian.&nbsp;&nbsp;Here are some of the lessons I learned:</span></div><div class="p3"><span class="s1"></span><br /></div><div class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Historical societies are only as good as their staff</b>.&nbsp; A non-profit historical society faces innumerable challenges, and staff members must be both able historians and creative administrators.&nbsp; Luckily, Hope and Stacen are talented directors.&nbsp; Their day-to-day schedules can seem like administrative work—compile the year-end financial report, design a mailing for the House Tour, get the bathroom painted.&nbsp;&nbsp; When they finally get to do fun history-related projects, like the House Tour or Dirty Old Boston, their work demonstrates an unparalleled passion for the South End.&nbsp; They go about their jobs with Public History best practice in mind, which ensures that the society remains a credible historical institution.&nbsp; The Society would lack integrity without skillful historians like Hope and Stacen.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div class="p3"><span class="s1"></span><br /></div><div class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>The Historical Society also benefits from an active Board and members.</b>&nbsp; When members volunteer to work on a project, organize an event, or simply stuff envelopes for an afternoon, they are investing much more than their time—they invest value into the Society. &nbsp; Having a strong membership base also provides the Society with a pool of diversely talented people, and when that group is passionate about their neighborhood’s history, everyone benefits.&nbsp; Member participation is essential to a successful historical society, and SEHS can always rely on a dynamic core of members. &nbsp;</span></div><div class="p3"><span class="s1"></span><br /></div><div class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Lastly, I now understand the important relationship between a community and its history.</b> In graduate school, we often discuss who has agency in the production of history.&nbsp; Who “does” history?&nbsp; Who “owns” it?&nbsp; In my opinion, history truly belongs to the public, and should be produced as such.&nbsp; An institution like the South End Historical Society becomes a facilitator for that history by being a part of the community.&nbsp; The community members who participate with SEHS become their own kind of public historians.&nbsp; It’s something that I don’t believe I could have understood just through class discussion; I had to see it first-hand. &nbsp;</span></div><div class="p3"><span class="s1"></span><br /></div><br /><div class="p1"><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">I lived and worked in the South End for only one summer, but the neighborhood and community made an impression on my perceptions of the public history field.</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">The lessons I learned from the South End will stay with me for a long time, and I’m excited to get back to Chicago to share my experiences.</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">I want to thank Hope and Stacen for teaching me so much—about the South End, about running a historical society, and for introducing me to Render.&nbsp;</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">I would also like to thank the SEHS members who, through their passion for the neighborhood, demonstrated that history is important to people—which also made me feel more secure about employment after grad school.</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt;">Thank you for a wonderful summer!</span></div>Stacen Goldmanhttps://plus.google.com/111932963244243065195noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-47441155384983922262013-05-30T11:44:00.000-04:002013-05-30T11:59:01.647-04:00Some History Behind the Buildings of the Boston Center for the ArtsThe <a href="http://www.bcaonline.org/">Boston Center for the Arts (BCA)</a> occupies several South End buildings on Tremont Street between Clarendon and Berkeley Streets. Some are historic and some are newer. Before these buildings became part of the BCA, they housed various businesses. I've been thinking about the BCA a lot lately because we just held our Spring Soiree fundraiser there on May 11th. No matter how many times I go into the Cyclorama, I'm always awed by the design and history of the building. The following information is taken from a guide written by our (the SEHS) founding president and long-time historian, Richard O. Card, and kept in our collections at the SEHS.<br /><br />"The kiosk [outside of the Cyclorama building]...was once the cupola on the Home of the Angel Guardian (designed by Gridley J. F. Bryant) in Roxbury. It was salvaged when that building was demolished in the early 1970s.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mufH91xHKdk/UadrozOyvZI/AAAAAAAABPk/yrC8NBMRGXk/s1600/George+Frost+Company+ad,+551+Tremont+St.+(smith+piano+building,+BCA)+ca.+1896.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mufH91xHKdk/UadrozOyvZI/AAAAAAAABPk/yrC8NBMRGXk/s320/George+Frost+Company+ad,+551+Tremont+St.+(smith+piano+building,+BCA)+ca.+1896.jpg" width="259" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Advertisement for the George Frost Company. <br />From the SEHS collections</td></tr></tbody></table>The leftmost of the buildings [the one closest to Clarendon St. that is the home of Hamersley's Bistro and the Beehive today]...was built in 1865 by Samuel and Henry Smith. Here they manufactured the Smith American Organ for nearly forty years...Their cases were assembled in a second building, located at 615 Albany Street, which was then near the lumber wharves along the South Bay. The Smiths also tried, less successfully, to manufacture pianos. The main building originally had another floor, with a mansard roof, but it was never restored after an 1885 fire. In 1892 the building was bought by the George Frost Company, which in 1906 extended it at the rear and came to employ some 400 people in the manufacture of the Gentleman's Boston Garter and the Velvet Grip Hose Supporter for ladies. This company remained until the 1940s, when the building came to be used by florists associated with the nearby flower market. Since 1970...this has been a part of the BCA.<br /><br />Behind...[this] building until 1990 stood the Pennock Building, an...early 20th-century garage, used for some years by the Boston Ballet and Boston Ballet School, as well as by the Community Music Center of Boston. This building was demolished to allow construction of the new home of the Boston Ballet on the site, completed in the summer of 1991.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9iiHlzC8W7M/UadrprwuywI/AAAAAAAABPs/W6swqdBQwH8/s1600/17+Clarendon+St+%25282%2529.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="427" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9iiHlzC8W7M/UadrprwuywI/AAAAAAAABPs/W6swqdBQwH8/s640/17+Clarendon+St+%25282%2529.jpg" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Pennock Building, 1972 image from the SEHS collections.<br />Do not reproduce, copy, or disseminate this <br />image without SEHS consent.&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table>...Next store to the Smith Organ factory [to the right of the Smith Organ building, if you look at it from Tremont Street], in 1877, was erected the Moody and Sankey Tabernacle. This building was considered 'temporary,' and stood only for about a year, but it was built of brick and iron and designed to seat 6,000 people. Dwight L. Moody, the renowned preacher, conducted revival meetings here twice a day for four months in the spring of 1877. Boston newspapers...printed his sermons as front page news. Ira Sankey was the featured vocal soloist. The revivals created such a sensation that special trains were run into the city to accommodate the crowds. Since horsecars were running regularly down Tremont Street by this time, it was easy to get here from one of the numerous Boston railroad stations.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div>On the same site, in 1884, rose the Gettysburg Cyclorama building. The great round structure, which originally had two towers flanking its Tremont Street entrance, was designed by Cummings and Sears...Its sole purpose was to display a great painting of the Battle of Gettysburg, 400 feet long and 50 feet high, by the French panorama painter Paul Philippoteaux. This painting was the twin of a Cyclorama of the Battle of Gettysburg already done by Philippoteaux for Willoughby and associates in Chicago. The Boston painting, somewhat cut down, is now displayed by the National Park Service in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania...Two later versions [were] done by Philippoteaux for Philadelphia and Brooklyn.<br /><br />One entered the Cyclorama building from Tremont Street and then climbed a circular staircase to the viewing platform, there to be completely surrounded by the painting, which was hung from a track...along the wall of the circular building. Between the painting and the viewer...[were] mounds of actual dirt, trees, cannons, fences, pieces of uniforms, wagon wheels, stacked rifles, and remnants of campfires. The effect was to make it difficult to tell where real objects ended and the painting began. A canvas sky concealed the windows that lighted the painting from above. You were made to feel that you were actually standing on Cemetery Ridge, looking forty miles in every direction, and watching Pickett's Confederate troops make their futile charge--all for only $0.50 admission.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-d6y7mIprq7E/UadtxpMC25I/AAAAAAAABQU/XVFljxCi80w/s1600/narkisim+orange+with+text+frame+Cyclorama.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-d6y7mIprq7E/UadtxpMC25I/AAAAAAAABQU/XVFljxCi80w/s1600/narkisim+orange+with+text+frame+Cyclorama.JPG" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Cyclorama in the 1890s when it served as the home to Waverley Bicycles, image from SEHS collections.<br />Do not reproduce, copy, or disseminate this image without SEHS consent.&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table>...Proprietors of the Gettysburg Cyclorama building...took down its original painting and exhibited other cycloramas depicting such diverse subjects as Custer's Last Fight, Jerusalem, the Hawaiian volcano Kilauea..., and something advertised as Napoleon in Hell. After use for roller skating, rough riding displays, and a Spanish American War fair, the building was turned into a garage...For this Tremont Garage the two towers were removed and the squared-off extension constructed along Tremont Street. In 1906 French bicycle racer Albert Champion rented space here, where he developed the A.C. Spark Plug. He moved in 1908 to a larger factory in Roxbury and eventually merged with General Motors.<br /><br />In 1922 the building was sold to the Boston Flower Exchange, Inc., which made it the center for the wholesale florist business of the region for nearly a half century. In 1970, [after]... a new flower exchange was built on Albany Street, the newly formed Boston Center for the Arts...was designated as the developer of this old building and several adjacent ones.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CfqEG_DD5_U/UadrtUHSvRI/AAAAAAAABQE/quIvcMajbzc/s1600/R001_Tremont_St_21.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="427" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CfqEG_DD5_U/UadrtUHSvRI/AAAAAAAABQE/quIvcMajbzc/s640/R001_Tremont_St_21.jpg" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Cyclorama in 1972 (note the top of the original Cyclorama dome peeking out above the main facade). <br />Image from SEHS collections.<br />Do not reproduce, copy, or disseminate this image without SEHS consent.&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9bDmg1molaE/Uadrsux__8I/AAAAAAAABP8/otgCIJrN2aw/s1600/537-541+tremont+1972.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="276" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9bDmg1molaE/Uadrsux__8I/AAAAAAAABP8/otgCIJrN2aw/s400/537-541+tremont+1972.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">National Theater in 1972. Image from SEHS collections.<br />Do not reproduce, copy, or disseminate this image without SEHS consent.&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table>...To the right of the Cyclorama building [was]...the National Theater, designed by Clarence Blackall and built in 1911. At that time it was supposedly the largest vaudeville house in the world. Its 3,500 seats allowed the prices to be kept very low...On the night of the theater opening, September 18, 1911, the overflow crowd quite literally broke the doors in. Bostonians listened to Irving Berlin's very first hit song, 'Alexander's Ragtime Band,' and made the orchestra play it over and over...<br /><br />Gradually vaudeville declined and the theater came to be devoted exclusively to motion pictures. Then, in the era of television, the movies themselves began to decline. E.M. Loew continued to run the National as a movie house until the night before the Boston Center for the Arts took it over in 1973. For a time after that it was used by the BCA...but it [was torn down in 1996. Today the Calderwood Pavilion stands in the National's former location].<br /><br />To the right of the [National Theater]...stood the Hotel Clarendon, an establishment managed for a long time by boxing legend John L. Sullivan. This hotel was destroyed by fire in 1969. The Odd Fellows Hall, an ornate Gothic white granite building built in 1871-1872, formerly occupied the entire corner space beyond that, but it too was destroyed by a...fire early in 1932." [Atelier 505 occupies the site today].<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2278/2351546874_2408e6093a_z.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Odd Fellows Hall, Berkeley Street facade. This image belongs to the Boston Public Library and may not be reproduced without their consent.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/2351546874/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/2351546874/</a></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6137/5951575500_c60bd659ff_z.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: start;">The Berkeley Street side of Odd Fellows Hall. 1932 fire. This image belongs to the Boston <br />Public Library and may not be reproduced without their consent.&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/5951575500/" style="font-size: medium; text-align: start;">http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/5951575500/</a></td></tr></tbody></table><br />Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-50065329847619559712013-02-04T17:51:00.000-05:002013-02-04T17:56:22.844-05:00Fox Brothers, South End GrocersAbout six months ago, a SEHS member donated a billhead from Fox Brothers, Grocers that dates to June 7, 1895. It indicates that Mr. L. E. Spaulding sold 294 dozen eggs to Fox Brothers between May 7th and June 4th, 1895. At $0.17 cents per dozen, Fox Brothers owed Mr. Spaulding $49.48. <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-gxNdaHoT2FE/URA68klwnrI/AAAAAAAABJM/xE3GIo4m2j0/s1600/Fox+Brothers.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="436" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-gxNdaHoT2FE/URA68klwnrI/AAAAAAAABJM/xE3GIo4m2j0/s640/Fox+Brothers.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><br /><br />Why did Fox Brothers need 294 dozen eggs in one month? They sold them at the grocery that they operated at 685 and 687 Tremont Street, on the corner of Tremont and West Newton Streets. <br /><br />In 1888, the publication<i> Leading Business men of Back Bay, South End, Boston Highlands, Jamaica Plain and Dorchester </i>described the store:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">“Fox Brothers, Grocers…one of the very best examples of what a Metropolitan Grocery Store should be, with which we are familiar, is that afforded by the establishment of Messrs. Fox Brothers… we believe that it would be difficult for the most critical to suggest a needed improvement in the fitting up and management of the store under existing conditions. Neither pains nor expense is spared to make this establishment thoroughly attractive and ‘wholesome‘ looking, both within and without, and the result is seen in one of the neatest and handsomest Grocery Stores in the city. Fox Brothers…having had very nearly a quarter of a century's experience… it is only natural that they should be perfectly conversant with their business in every detail. The [store] comprise[s] one floor and a basement, their dimensions being 40 x 70 feet, and employment is afforded thirteen efficient assistants, who may be depended on to strive their utmost to show customers prompt and civil attention. The stock on hand is so large and varied that it would be idle to even attempt a full description of it, but it may be said to include all kinds of Groceries, both Staple and Fancy, and to be as remarkable for uniform merit as it is for variety. The very finest flavored Teas, Coffees and Spices are handled by this house, and those who are able to appreciate a good article in this line will find that their tastes may be fully suited here, as all grades, from the mildest to the strongest, are supplied at the lowest attainable rates. Canned Goods are also given particular attention, and some delicious relishes and condiments are also on hand.”</blockquote>Now this site is home to the eastern portion of the South End Branch of the Boston Public Library but the Fox Brothers occupied this location from at least 1870 to at least 1915. They may have been there longer—these are just the earliest and latest dates that I found evidence for. The excerpt above indicates that, in 1888, Fox Brothers had “very nearly a quarter of a century's experience,” indicating that they had been in business since sometime in the 1860s. <br /><br />The 1870 directory tells us that Charles E. Fox and Co. operated a grocery here and lived at 114 West Newton Street. By 1885 however, brothers John and Frank are listed as owning the grocery store and one or both may have lived at 114 West Newton Street. 114 West Newton Street was the same building as 685 Tremont Street, but the upstairs living quarters at 114 would have been accessed from a door on the West Newton Street side and the store accessed from the Tremont Street side. In 1905, John Fox was living at 126 Berkeley Street.<br /><br />If you lived in the South End around the turn of the last century and wanted to contact them, all you had to do was call them on the telephone. The number? Trem. 230. Or you&nbsp; might hop on the Tremont Street streetcar. Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-82378602449297699262013-01-10T08:00:00.000-05:002013-01-10T23:52:30.889-05:00Spotlight on Collections: What can we learn from “Lynn’s Most Perfect Baby”?<div style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: small;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5bIdZUrekco/UOy6kWCjUYI/AAAAAAAAACc/deb-odV-a5M/s1600/Lynne+Perfect+Baby.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="640" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5bIdZUrekco/UOy6kWCjUYI/AAAAAAAAACc/deb-odV-a5M/s640/Lynne+Perfect+Baby.jpg" width="319" /></a></span></div><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: small;">Recently, a pair of newspaper articles from 1912-1913 have been making the rounds of pop culture blogging websites <a href="http://jezebel.com/5970466/meet-1912s-perfect-women-pear+shaped-171-lbs-doesnt-know-fear" target="_blank">Jezebel</a>, <a href="http://gothamist.com/2012/12/20/1912s_perfect_woman_was_from_brookl.php" target="_blank">Gothamist</a>, and <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/26/perfect-woman-1912_n_2365529.html" target="_blank">The Huffington Post</a>.&nbsp; In December of 1912 <a href="http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F7071FFA3B5813738DDDA80A94DA415B828DF1D3" target="_blank">The New York Times</a> published that Elsie Scheel, a 24 year-old co-ed at Cornell University’s College of Horticulture, was “The Perfect Girl.”&nbsp; Two months later, in February of 1913, a similar article was published about Elsie in <a href="http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=8-1fAAAAIBAJ&amp;sjid=AgMGAAAAIBAJ&amp;pg=1468,668285" target="_blank">The Sunday Morning Star</a>, explaining that Elsie’s perfection was rooted in her uncanny resemblance to the Venus de Milo, brought on by “sane living."&nbsp; It’s easy to see why Elsie’s story is so compelling to today's blogs.&nbsp; It’s fun and quirky and all three sites highlight the articles’ more humorous aspects, including Elsie’s love of beefsteak (evidenced by the byline “Beefsteak her Mainstay”) and her claim that she “doesn’t know what fear is.”&nbsp; Elsie's story also puts the ideals of the early twentieth century in stark contrast with our own modern ones, specifically regarding women’s bodies.&nbsp; <br /><br />While these are legitimately interesting aspects of Elsie’s story, what I found to be most striking about the articles was that we had something<i> just </i>like them in the collections at the South End Historical Society (SEHS).&nbsp; We have an article, published in 1916 by an unknown paper in Lynn, MA, which declares that Edith M. O’Shea is “Lynn’s most perfect baby physically.”&nbsp; This article came to us as a part of the Aertsen-Blair collection, a box of old photographs (and this newspaper article) found in the rowhouse at 175 West Brookline Street and donated to the SEHS by the current residents.&nbsp; Through some research, we determined that these photos belonged to a former resident of the house, Beatrice Gallivan (the SEHS held a program about the house, the collection, and our journey researching it about <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/great-turnout-for-four-families-program/" target="_blank">a month ago</a>).&nbsp; Edith O’Shea, Lynn’s most perfect baby, was Beatrice Gallivan’s niece.&nbsp; Nineteen month-old Edith was determined to be 99% physically perfect for a girl of her age (she missed that last 1% because “her tongue was coated at the time of the examination and she suffered from discoloration”), and was declared the most physically perfect of all 500 babies entered in what was then called a “Baby Show.”<br /><br />Now, of course, Edith’s story taken alone seems like just another quirky and compelling artifact of times past, but that would be missing the bigger picture. What’s really interesting is that when taken in conjunction with the articles about Elsie Scheel, it becomes clear that studies of physical perfection were a trend in the early twentieth century, and that such studies were important enough to the popular culture of the time to make the newspapers.&nbsp; In fact, a search of Pro-Quest Historical Newspapers for an article between 1900 and 1920 with the word “perfect” in their titles yields a multitude of such articles: “How Vivian Vaugh Became ‘The Perfect Woman’” (The Chicago Daily Tribune, 1905), “Perfect Baby is Challenged: Denver’s Champion Infant Throws Down Gauntlet” (Los Angeles Times, 1913), “The Perfect Man: Ralph Rose Compared with the Apollo Belvedere” (The Atlanta Constitution, 1905).&nbsp; The similarities between the Edith and Elsie stories are obviously more than just a coincidence, so what is this article about Edith really telling us about American culture in the early twentieth century?<br /><br />The first thing we can learn from Edith’s story is that attitudes towards women’s and girls’ health were changing drastically in the early 1900s.&nbsp; Edith’s mother claimed that “lots of sleep and fresh air have made Edith the prize morsel of humanity she is,” and the article insists that all of the prize-winners in the Lynn contest were “fresh air babies, accorded the best of food and care” and that none “look[ed] petted or coddled.”&nbsp; This is evidence of the new understanding that moderation, fresh air, and especially athleticism were important for the well-being of women and girls.&nbsp; This is reflected in another article from <i>The Chicago Tribune</i> published in 1907 titled “Chicago Producing MOST PERFECT RACE OF WOMEN in the World.”&nbsp; The article is about the city’s new athletic facilities for women, which were “giving to Chicago a new generation, a generation of perfect women, free from ills, strong, self-reliant, and beautiful.”&nbsp; The city of Chicago likewise declared that as a result of their increased numbers of playgrounds and gymnasiums for girls, “the rising generation of Chicago girls will be more beautiful, healthful, and normal than the one preceding it.”&nbsp; At the time this was written, it had not been long since the ideal woman would have never had the strength to take up physical tasks for their own health, let alone play basketball, as the young girls of Chicago were encouraged to do.&nbsp; Still, as the twentieth century got underway and the movement for women’s suffrage (which, incidentally, was a favorite cause of Elsie Scheel’s) gained traction, women were increasingly seen as strong, independent, and athletic individuals.&nbsp; This is seen in the two articles about Elsie, both of which emphasize her athleticism and discuss her propensity for physical labor and her “tramps” through the wilderness.&nbsp; Edith and Elsie are both proof that in the early twentieth Century, frail women were out and strong women were in.<br /><br />The cultural obsession with physical perfection that we see in our article about little Edith is also linked to another, darker aspect of United States history at the turn of the century.&nbsp; Lynn’s “Baby Show,” as well as Cornell’s study of co-eds, were undertaken at the height of the American Eugenics Movement.&nbsp; Although most people associate it with the policies of Nazi Germany, Eugenics was very popular in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century.&nbsp; The Eugenics Movement encouraged American racism and xenophobia while influencing state health policies, which led to the forced sterilization of tens of thousands of American citizens because of race, class, or mental disability.&nbsp; One key aspect of the American Eugenics Movement was the process of selective breeding, which involved identifying genetically perfect specimens to breed with each other.&nbsp; Although there is no mention of “breeding” the babies, Lynn’s contest to find the most physically perfect children is undoubtedly connected to the goal of identifying the “fittest” specimens in the city. This connection becomes all the more clear when taken in conjunction with yet another article about “perfect” babies, “Perfect Babies to Mate for the Good of the Race: Remarkable Pact Between the Mothers of Hundred-Point Infants” (Los Angeles Times, 1915).&nbsp; This article, which includes the byline “Parents Plan Future Union in Eugenics’ Name,” tells the story of two children whose mothers arranged their marriage soon after they both scored 100% in a “Baby Show” almost identical to the one held in Lynn.&nbsp; Both children were the winners of multiple “Eugenic trophies” at the time of the betrothal. <br /><br />Whether Edith’s parents were consciously thinking about selective breeding when entering their children into the Lynn contest is impossible to say but probably unlikely.&nbsp; Likewise, based on the articles about Elsie Scheel, it’s doubtful that she was a fervent Eugenicist looking for her “perfect” mate.&nbsp; Still it’s important to remember that historical artifacts like these ones don’t stand alone. When one makes it onto our modern pop-culture radar, it shouldn’t just be something we giggle at and move on. Yes, the byline “Beefsteak Her Mainstay” seems funny to us now -- and there’s nothing wrong with having a laugh at history -- but we should also feel encouraged to think about the things we read historically.&nbsp; Edith and Elsie were the results of a complex culture that has since disappeared, and it’s that complexity that really makes them so compelling.</span>Stacen Goldmanhttps://plus.google.com/111932963244243065195noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-9028138140061079902012-06-23T13:11:00.000-04:002013-02-04T17:54:16.088-05:00The Everett Letters: October 14, 1851<div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><b>What have the Everetts been up to?</b></span></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><i>Business at Rowes Wharf, the famous singer Jenny Lind, and some discussion about Irish domestic servants.</i></span></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">See their letters from <a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/05/everett-letters-august-19-1851.html" style="color: blue;">August 19, 1851</a> and <a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/05/everett-letters-september-23-1851.html" style="color: blue;">September 23, 1851</a> for their earlier correspondence and some notes about the history behind the letters and the neighborhood.</span></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ebZ48XOEK5s/T-X0yGIphBI/AAAAAAAABA8/JR8QSCbgfZM/s1600/img512.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="640" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ebZ48XOEK5s/T-X0yGIphBI/AAAAAAAABA8/JR8QSCbgfZM/s640/img512.jpg" width="514" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Image courtesy of the <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/" style="color: blue;">South End Historical Society</a></span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">My dear Son, [Otis Everett Sr. writing to Otis Jr.]</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Our last letter to you was under date of 24 September, forwarded by overland mail to Calcutta, which I hope will come duly to hand.&nbsp; I suppose that you are now on your passage from Bombay to Calcutta, where this will meet you.&nbsp; Thomas &amp; Percy left here on Saturday morning 27 Sept., stopping at Brandon till Monday morn’g, from thence thro’ Lake Champlain to Montreal &amp; Quebec &amp; Niagara, stopping at Victory near Saratoga to see Geo. White, and home by way of Albany &amp; Springfield, being absent 2 weeks.&nbsp; They had a capital time.&nbsp; Percy as usual is quite busy.&nbsp; He has been at Charlestown several days from early in the morning to late in the afternoon attending to shipping of ice by the ship <i>Townsend</i> for Calcutta.&nbsp; I saw Mr. Sharp &amp; few days since he has opened an office as Notary Public nearly opposite the N.E. Bank <b><i>[67 State Street]</i></b><i> </i>.&nbsp; I learn that their accounts were in a bad state but do not know what they will be short [if] Mr. Bradlee &amp; Mr. Hall pay their debts.&nbsp; So that is not a failure but very near akin to one.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">As I went down to Commercial Wharf to get my Rowes Wharf dividend, I could hardly help looking up to the old store, but did not see you or “Sam.”&nbsp; The store appeared to be closed.&nbsp; Business has been rather dull &amp; money most terrible scarce.&nbsp; The Banks did nothing &amp; the best paper was sold at from 1 to 2 percentage points a month discount.&nbsp; There have been some failures, amongst others David Pingree of Salem has been compelled to stop, tho’ it is said he will have something left after paying his debts.&nbsp; The Thompsonville &amp; Tanffville[?] Mfg. Co. have also failed.&nbsp; Sharp &amp; Co. did not have any of their paper.&nbsp; Iasigi &amp; Goddard <b><i>[merchants at 36 Central Wharf]</i></b><i> </i>had some 20 to 30,000 &amp; W. R. Kendall also a large amount.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Clipper ships are yet quite in fashion.&nbsp; The <i>Flying Cloud</i> made a splendid passage, 89 days to San Francisco.&nbsp; The <i>Flying Fish</i> in the same model is now loading; Capt. Nickels, late of the <i>J. Q. Adams</i> is to command her.&nbsp; As usual I receive a letter from Canton by every mail and shall expect your Uncle John home during the next year.&nbsp; Capt. Faucon is still here and has taken up his abode with Mrs. Greene in Dover St.&nbsp;&nbsp; <b><i>[Benjamin H. Greene was at 77 Dover Street.]</i></b><i>&nbsp; </i>He usually takes tea with us on Sundays.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">17th.&nbsp; Your very welcome letter dated Bombay 31<span style="position: relative; top: -3pt;">st</span>&nbsp;Aug. was just this moment handed me by Percy.&nbsp; It came in the English steamer this morning.&nbsp; We heard by telegraph yesterday from Halifax of your arrival out and of course were expecting letters today.&nbsp; I am glad to hear that you had so pleasant a voyage out.&nbsp; I hope you will write us again from Bombay as often as you have an opportunity.&nbsp; Do not let a mail leave without writing.&nbsp; This will be the last letter from home, unless you remain at Calcutta, which you will receive …&nbsp; If you come home in the vessel let me advise you to keep the right side of Capt. Ewer. &nbsp;If he is not so agreeable as you could wish, don’t mind it, make the best of it, do what <u>you</u> can to make all go smoothly and pleasantly.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Your aff. father,</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Otis Everett</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Dear Otis,</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">You surely are the very best of all good boys to write such a nice, full, long letter.&nbsp; We had the Telegraphic news from Halifax of the arrival of the <i>Equator</i>, but had to wait twenty-four hours for your letter.&nbsp; Father and I were both waked about midnight by the gun announcing the steamer in the harbour, and our first waking thought was, “There comes Otis’s letter.”&nbsp; Uncles, aunts, and cousins came to the house to ask “What news from Otis,” and we received many congratulations upon the receipt of the much wished-for letter.&nbsp; Your voyage was shorter than we thought it would be and your resistance to sea-sickness far exceeded our expectations.&nbsp; I can hardly believe that you are the same boy that turned sick at swinging and grew pale on the back seat of a carriage, but if your other manly traits have developed in the same proportion, I am well content.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-JExjfvW1pXw/T-X2Tw-ix2I/AAAAAAAABBE/uvBUsBpQokY/s1600/elephanta.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-JExjfvW1pXw/T-X2Tw-ix2I/AAAAAAAABBE/uvBUsBpQokY/s320/elephanta.jpg" width="320" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Picture of one of the Elephanta Caves, Island of </span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Elephanta, from <a href="http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/244">UNESCO website</a></span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">Capt. Faucon says your description of Bombay is very correct and that the Island of Elephanta is well worth seeing.&nbsp; He has promised to lend me the pamphlet of the tour that you spoke of, and he knows all about everybody and everything that you mention.&nbsp; He is perfectly delighted with his new boarding place and says he has never felt so much at home for years.&nbsp; He is quite a constant visitor at our home and always a welcome one.&nbsp; Snap and Nelly are well and feel quite proud of Gip’s popularity.&nbsp; Ann has gone to live with Mrs. David Weld, and a young sister of Esther’s, just arrived, takes her place at our house.&nbsp; <b><i>[Ann and Esther were presumably Irish immigrant girls working as servants in the Everett household.]</i></b><i> </i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2jqmrYSPkOI/T-X3It22NCI/AAAAAAAABBM/x4HKdQINxGc/s1600/Church+of+the+Savior.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2jqmrYSPkOI/T-X3It22NCI/AAAAAAAABBM/x4HKdQINxGc/s400/Church+of+the+Savior.jpg" width="363" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Church of the Savior, Bedford St., Boston. Courtesy of </span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">the <a href="http://www.bpl.org/" style="color: blue;">Boston Public Library</a> from their <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/5474352344/" style="color: blue;">Flickr Page</a></span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">Anna Adams died a week since of quick consumption.&nbsp; She is a great loss, and her death is much felt by all her acquaintance.&nbsp; I have just received a wedding card from James Clapp, who has taken up his abode in Roxbury.&nbsp; Anna Smith is to be married next Thursday, and has a large levee at Mr. Huskins brother’s, where they are to board.&nbsp; Carry Curtis is to be married in three weeks.&nbsp; She will be married about 11 o’clock in Mr. Waterston’s church, after which she receives morning calls at home.&nbsp; <b><i>[Rev. Robert C. Waterston was minister of Church of the Savior, a Unitarian church on Bedford Street.]</i></b><b>&nbsp; </b>In the evening Aunt Curtis has a family party, like our Thanksgiving gatherings, and the next morning they start for the West to be gone all winter.&nbsp; They intend to visit Niagara and the Mammoth Cave on their way and be back about April.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Thomas and Percy stayed whilst at Niagara at the same house with Jenny Lind.&nbsp; <b><i>[Jenny Lind, the Swedish nightingale, the most famous diva of the 19th century, was then on tour in the United States.&nbsp; P.T. Barnum managed her tour and created <a href="http://chnm.gmu.edu/lostmuseum/nightingale/" style="color: blue;">"Lindomania,"</a> a craze for all things Jenny Lind.] </i></b>&nbsp;They had the room directly opposite hers and heard her sing for two hours.&nbsp; They went under the sheet at Niagara, walked over the suspension bridge, crossed the river close to the falls in a skiff, and saw all other wonders.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">We all had a sad start the other day by hearing that Aunt Williams had had a fall and broken her ankle bone.&nbsp; I went immediately out, and felt quite relieved when I saw how cheerful and comfortable she was.&nbsp; She had just returned from riding, and their man (who always lifts her) had taken her safely from the carriage and set her in a chair on the steps, when William <b><i>[William Williams, her son]</i></b>, thinking her too near the edge, moved the chair a very little, when she fell forwards down the whole flight.&nbsp; She immediately fainted and remained insensible until some time after she was placed upon the bed.&nbsp; The Doctor was procured as soon as possible who set the bone, and now it is quite healed.&nbsp; She thought a great deal more about William<b> </b>than about herself, as he feels so badly about it that we thought he never would get over it.&nbsp; He has always been so careful of his mother that he could not bear to have her have the least jar, and to think that he should let her fall was altogether too much for his fortitude, but with her usual fortitude she made as light of it as possible, and the next day but one was carried out as usual to breakfast, and since then has taken her accustomed place in the family, to the great relief of us all.&nbsp; </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">All the other members of the family are jogging on the same as usual.&nbsp; Pray do not lose a word of your journal, but write it out as full as you can.&nbsp; I think you must have looked exceedingly graceful getting into the Palanquin <b><i>[an enclosed litter carried on bearers’ shoulders with poles]</i></b><i> </i>for the first time.&nbsp; I do not believe I should have known you to have met you in one.&nbsp; I suppose I must leave a little bit of blank paper for father, and so, with ever so much love, I remain your affectionate</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mother</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Monday 20th</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; font-size: small;">I must put this into the Post Office today to go by the steamer from New York on Wednesday, tho’ if you have a quick passage round from Bombay to Calcutta &amp; do not meet with much detention there this letter will hardly reach you .&nbsp; Just before I left home this morning Mr. James Edward Blake from Warwick called at the house.&nbsp; He is here on a visit.&nbsp; I went with him to Whittemores the Rifle Makers &amp; to Uncle Williams’ store.&nbsp; I hope that whilst he is here we may have an opportunity to try some shooting.&nbsp; He says the dog you gave him is getting to be very good at hunting.&nbsp; Not long since he started a rabbit in the road.&nbsp; They had quite a long run but he caught him &amp; brot him in.&nbsp; He &amp; the cat eat together out of the same dish, so he does not inherit his father’s antipathy to cats.&nbsp; It is now getting to be cold, so that we have to take Nelly into the house.&nbsp; Snap does not much like being alone but we let him in occasionally.&nbsp; I told him about your letter.&nbsp; He looked up in my face with his usual knowing look as much as to say I understand it.&nbsp; I told him I was writing you &amp; asked him if he had anything to say.&nbsp; He said, “Sigh, sigh,” which I suppose means, tell&nbsp; … </span><span style="font-size: small;"><b><i>[The last sheet of Otis Everett’s letter to his son is missing]</i></b></span></div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-83690908599324972712012-05-23T10:01:00.001-04:002012-05-23T10:01:40.665-04:00The Everett Letters: September 23, 1851<div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;">Last week I posted the first in a long series of letters written by members of the Everett family.&nbsp; See the<span style="color: blue;"> </span><a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/05/everett-letters-august-19-1851.html"><span style="color: blue;">first letter</span>,</a> written on August 19, 1851.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;">These letters were written between 1851 and 1859 and contain the correspondence between Otis and Elizabeth Blake Everett in Boston and their son Otis Blake Everett who was working in India.&nbsp; Other family members also write occasionally.&nbsp; In the 1850s Otis and Elizabeth Everett lived in a house in the South End near where the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Cathedral High School stand today. </div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AdCH5Ui0c9c/T7zpPVs-AKI/AAAAAAAAA_w/YtmvPsSUQPw/s1600/1852+Norman+B+Leventhal.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="246" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AdCH5Ui0c9c/T7zpPVs-AKI/AAAAAAAAA_w/YtmvPsSUQPw/s640/1852+Norman+B+Leventhal.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"> <span class="title"><span style="font-size: small;">A snapshot of a part of "Map of the City of Boston and immediate neighborhood," by Henry McIntyre, 1852.&nbsp; From the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library:<a href="http://maps.bpl.org/id/10180"> http://maps.bpl.org/id/10180</a>.&nbsp; The image at left shows the area around Washington Street, Malden Street, and Waltham Street.&nbsp; The image at right is a close up of the same map that shows Blake's Court off of Washington Street.&nbsp; The Everetts lived in the house on the corner of Washington St. and Blake's Court.&nbsp; If you look closely, you can see the house labeled as "O.H. Everett."&nbsp; Other families who appear in later letters are also represented on this map, like the Weld family, whose house was located just to the west of Blake's Court.</span></span></td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span class="title"><br /></span></td></tr></tbody></table><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;">This series of letters offers a rare glimpse in to the private life of a mid-nineteenth century South End family.&nbsp; The founding Historical Society president, Richard Card, transcribed the letters and researched the Everett family.&nbsp; He found the following:</div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: 0.25in;"><i>"Otis Everett (father), born in 1803, was bookkeeper to William Amory at 65 State Street.&nbsp; He was married to Elizabeth Lowell Blake (mother) and at this time </i>[the time the letters were written]<i> they were still living in what had been her father’s house, on the corner of Blake Court </i>[about where Union Park Street and Washington Street. intersect, on the Cathedral side of the street]<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">, then numbered as 928 Washington Street.&nbsp; They had three sons, of whom the eldest was Otis Blake Everett, born in 1829, who was employed by the merchant firm of Tuckerman &amp; Co., in Calcutta.&nbsp; The middle son was Thomas B. Everett, a clerk on India Wharf and later a partner with Frank Hodgkinson in a merchant firm.&nbsp; In 1854 he married Sarah E. Greene (whose family lived at 77 Dover Street and whose brother George was in Calcutta) and they took a house in Roxbury.&nbsp; The youngest son (born in 1833) was Percival L. Everett, who was employed at this time by Augustine Heard &amp; Co, in Canton, China.&nbsp; In later years he was president of the Third National Bank.</i></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: 0.25in;"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">A wide array of uncles, aunts, cousins, neighbors, and dogs are mentioned in the letters, often by initials or nicknames.&nbsp; Probably the various Darracott, Williams, and Curtis relatives spring from married sisters of one of the Everetts or Blakes.&nbsp; JHE is Mr. Everett’s brother John H. Everett, while JHB is Mrs. Everett’s brother John H. Blake.&nbsp; The Everett’s cook is Esther, with Catherine probably serving as maid.&nbsp; And in India, Otis B. Everett is sharing a house with Goodwin Whitney and later also with his brother George Whitney..</i></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-left: 0.25in;"><i>One should keep in mind that mail steamers normally left only twice a month, and that Calcutta-Boston mail generally took close to two months in each direction.&nbsp; In other words, it would take some four months to receive an answer to a question asked in any letter.&nbsp; And England and France were at war with Russia in the Crimea, causing further disruptions."</i><br /><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;">With that, here is the second letter, dated September 23, 1851.&nbsp; Bracketed sentences are comments of Richard Card's that he added during the transcription.<br /><br /><!--[if gte mso 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</style><![endif]--> <br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7OUSxcaNqvA/T7zrZEr8ezI/AAAAAAAABAA/oPSf7aQ1P1E/s1600/img506.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="497" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7OUSxcaNqvA/T7zrZEr8ezI/AAAAAAAABAA/oPSf7aQ1P1E/s640/img506.jpg" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: small;">Everett Letters, Richard O. Card Collection,<br /> courtesy of the South End Historical Society, <br />Letter: September 23, 1851</span></span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><b><i><span>[From Otis' brother Thomas Everett.&nbsp; The beginning of this letter from Thomas to Otis has been lost.]</span></i></b></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;</span>… Father and mother spent a fortnight at Manataug this summer, which they enjoyed extremely.<span>&nbsp; </span>The company consisted of old Mr. Weld &amp; Martha, Uncle John W’s family, Mrs. Green &amp; Mary Darracott, Capt’n Faucon, Mary Blake &amp; Charlie Parker.<span>&nbsp; </span>During their absence Puss </span><b><i><span>[brother Percy]</span></i></b><i><span> </span></i><span>&amp; I kept old bachelors’ hall at home, except the Sundays they were there, which we passed with them.<span>&nbsp; </span>They return’d looking brown as berries and perfectly delighted with their visit.<span>&nbsp; </span>The ladies played all manner of jokes upon Capt’n F., and he in return did the same to them.<span>&nbsp; </span>Mary Blake seemed to be almost crazy with delight.<span>&nbsp; </span>She could hardly sleep at night, so much did she admire to look at the water, and be out breathing the invigorating atmosphere of that place.<span>&nbsp; </span>Father was very lucky at fishing, and caught several very large tautog. … Altho’ I have many more things to say, want of time to relate them compels me to bring this to a close, and I therefore transfer the remainder of news to mother’s much more agreeable and ready pen to relate.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Remaining your affectionate brother,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Thomas B. Everett</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>September 23, 1851</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Dear Otis,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>I most gladly take up the pen where Thomas laid it down, for as I cannot talk to you, writing is next best.<span>&nbsp; </span>We have not got accustomed to your absence yet, and after almost every interval of silence when we are all together comes the exclamation, “If only we could get a letter from Otis.”<span>&nbsp; </span>But I hope we shall not have to wait much longer before we hear of your good health, safe arrival, and promising business prospects.<span>&nbsp; </span>Thomas and Percy started yesterday for Brandon, and father and I are so lonely that we want you more than ever.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Aunt Catherine spent the Jubilee week with us and we had a grand time going about together.<span>&nbsp; </span></span><b><i><span>[A railroad jubilee celebrating the linking of Boston railroad lines with Montreal culminated in a grand parade on Sept. 19, 1851, with a formal dinner on Boston Common attended by U.S. President Millard Fillmore.]</span></i></b><i><span></span></i><span>We went to Mrs. Greene’s to see the great procession and Dover Street far outshone all other streets in its adornments, for no expense was spared, and the cheers of the passers-by were one continual “Hurra.”<span>&nbsp; </span>In the evening we had Cheney’s open barouche and rode all over the city to see the illuminations and fireworks.<span>&nbsp; </span></span><b><i><span>[John E. Cheney’s livery stable was on the corner of Washington and Dover Streets.<span>&nbsp; </span>A barouche is a carriage with a driver’s seat in front, two double seats inside facing each other, and a folding top.]</span></i></b><i> </i><span>&nbsp;</span><span>We had some splendid ones on Blackstone Square, and altogether the week went off grandly to everyone’s satisfaction without accident or disgrace from any one.</span></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YfFzSdkrg1U/T7zruyp5oyI/AAAAAAAABAQ/KFaoxnWxKgI/s1600/img507.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="640" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YfFzSdkrg1U/T7zruyp5oyI/AAAAAAAABAQ/KFaoxnWxKgI/s640/img507.jpg" width="499" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Everett Letters, Richard O. Card Collection,<br /> courtesy of the South End Historical Society, <br />Letter: September 23, 1851</span></span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Thomas has told you about our Marblehead excursion.<span>&nbsp; </span>We enjoyed every moment of it and I never laughed so much in my life before, all put together.<span>&nbsp; </span>And now let me think if Thomas has forgotten any thing in the news way that has lately happened.<span>&nbsp; </span>O yes!<span>&nbsp; </span>Flagg has sold out his store and bought out King’s line of omnibusses and moved to Roxbury.<span>&nbsp; </span>Johnson, who kept near Northampton St. has taken Flagg’s house and store </span><b><i><span>[across Washington Street from the Everett house]</span></i></b><span>, and it goes on the same as usual.<span>&nbsp; </span>The Pierponts </span><b><i><span>[William A. Pierpont &amp; Co., brass founders at 407 Harrison Avenue, corner of Blake’s Court.</span></i></b><b><span>]</span></b><span> have failed but hope to be able to make arrangements to keep on their business.<span>&nbsp; </span>Mr. Babbitt has bought a house in Roxbury and moved out there, and offers his old one for sale at 16 thousand dollars. … </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>We have had a terrible tornado in this vicinity, being most destructive in West Cambridge and Medford.<span>&nbsp; </span>Many houses were entirely leveled and the largest trees twisted entirely up by the roots.<span>&nbsp; </span>A&nbsp;heavily loaded baggage wagon was carried several feet.<span>&nbsp; </span>Mr. Pierpont’s house </span><b><i><span>[in Roxbury]</span></i></b><span> was unroofed and the roof carried a great distance, and several persons were killed.<span>&nbsp; </span>All around the outskirts of the tornado it was perfectly still.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Now for family folks!<span>&nbsp; </span>All the wanderers have returned to their homes since cool weather commenced.<span>&nbsp; </span>William Williams arrived a fortnight since in good health, notwithstanding his severe exposures.<span>&nbsp; </span>He seems to have enjoyed his excursion and has gained a great deal of knowledge and experience.<span>&nbsp; </span>He says he has frequently slept in the open air with no protection but a single blanket in the severest tropical rains, and in one place was so short of food that they cooked the monkeys, and that although they had an excellent cook yet it passed his skill to make them palatable, excepting in the form of soup, for either roasted or fried they were tougher than tough.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Carry Curtis is preparing for her wedding, which takes place the last of October.<span>&nbsp; </span>She goes West with George to pass the winter.<span>&nbsp; </span>I believe we wrote you that George purchased Fanny </span><b><i><span>[a dog]</span></i></b><i><span> </span></i><span>to carry out West.<span>&nbsp; </span>She arrived there safe and all were delighted with her, but to their great regret she has since been stolen.<span>&nbsp; </span>Aunt Mary Curtis has been very sick , bleeding at the lungs, and we are still anxious for her lest she should have a return of the complaint, but she is now out of immediate danger and we hope will entirely recover.<span>&nbsp; </span>Anna Adams has had a similar attack and for many days was given over by the physicians, but they now feel encouraged again, and if she does not go into a rapid consumption </span><b><i><span>[an old name for tuberculosis]</span></i></b><span> they think she may get well. … Snap and Nelly send their love to Gip </span><b><i><span>[also a dog]</span></i></b><span> and wish to know how he likes a sailor’s life.<span>&nbsp; </span>They both enjoy good health and have lost none of the music of their voices when the boys go down the lane.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>The South End Market progresses rapidly </span><b><i><span>[The Williams Market, then being built on the corner of Washington and Dover Streets, had market stalls below and a meeting hall upstairs.<span>&nbsp; </span>It was later the New Grand Theatre.]</span></i></b><i><span> </span></i><span><span>&nbsp;</span>The street has been paved from Dover to Brookline Streets, and Union Park (back of Mr. Clapp’s store) </span><b><i><span>[Clapp’s was later Flagg’s]</span></i></b><span> is having an iron fence erected round it, and preparations for a fountain, so we shall look in nice order when you return.<span>&nbsp; </span>We have heard twice of the <i>Equator</i>’s being spoken, but got no letters, and we feared from your location at the time that you would make a long passage.<span>&nbsp; </span>But, however, we hope to hear from you in the month of November, and I try to be as patient as possible.<span>&nbsp; </span>Do write every opportunity, and write every little thing, if it be ever so trifling, that we should like to hear, for you were always the best news gatherer in the family, and pray keep up the accomplishment on paper.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>With ever so much love from father and me,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Your affectionate Mother,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>E.L.E.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Dear Otis,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span>Your mother and Thomas having written you all the news. it only remains for me to say that I miss you very much and just now we are all alone, Thomas &amp; Percy being on a journey.<span>&nbsp; </span>Your mother goes to Dorchester this PM, so I shall dine all alone.<span>&nbsp; </span>Do be particular &amp; write us by every opportunity.<span>&nbsp; </span>I have written you once to Bombay &amp; once to Calcutta, which I hope you have rec’d.<span>&nbsp; </span>Some of us may perhaps write again next month, which will be our last letter as after that a letter would not probably reach you.<span>&nbsp; </span>I have not seen either Mr. Sharp or Bradlee since they stopped payment </span><b><i><span>[in other words, their business failed]</span></i></b><i><span> </span></i><span><span>&nbsp;</span>I learn that Mr. Bradlee &amp; Mr. Hale pay all their debts.<span>&nbsp; </span>You know that I have always said that young people living so fast would sooner or later come to the end of their purse.<span>&nbsp; </span>Mr. Jonah B. felt rather cross about it.<span>&nbsp; </span>I have no more news &amp; so can only wish you a pleasant voyage home.</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Your aff. father,</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Otis Everett</span></span></div></div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-91286401702928088162012-05-16T21:00:00.000-04:002012-05-16T21:14:57.636-04:00The Everett Letters: August 19, 1851<div class="separator" style="clear: both; font-family: inherit; text-align: center;"></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Oo8SxIwAJDI/T7RRBSmLfII/AAAAAAAAA_c/iNA0h0U9kEw/s1600/My+Dear+Son.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="144" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Oo8SxIwAJDI/T7RRBSmLfII/AAAAAAAAA_c/iNA0h0U9kEw/s640/My+Dear+Son.JPG" width="640" /></a></div>Years ago, Richard Card, the founding SEHS president, was told of the existence of a bunch of old letters stored in a shoebox in an attic of a South End house that was being renovated.&nbsp; He purchased the letters, which he transcribed.&nbsp; Richard found that the letters were written between 1851 and 1859 and contain the correspondence between Otis and Elizabeth Blake Everett in Boston and their son Otis Blake Everett who was working in India.&nbsp; Otis and Elizabeth Everett lived in a house near where the Cathedral of the Holy Cross stands today.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;">Last week, Richard released the letters from his private collection and officially donated them to the Historical Society. After one hundred and fifty plus years they are in remarkably good condition. They contain an immense amount of detail about family connections, weather events, weddings, births, deaths, recreational activities, business concerns, trade items, and so much more.</div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;">Over the next several weeks, I will be posting images of the letters and the accompanying transcriptions.&nbsp; Bracketed items are Richard's notes where he felt additional information might be helpful.&nbsp; I hope you enjoy the story of the Everetts and this rare glimpse into the personal lives of a nineteenth century family.&nbsp; </div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; font-family: inherit; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3jWsvw0DIgY/T7RJFoUZFtI/AAAAAAAAA_A/arioer6Idmk/s1600/img502.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3jWsvw0DIgY/T7RJFoUZFtI/AAAAAAAAA_A/arioer6Idmk/s400/img502.jpg" width="316" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Everett Letters, Richard O. Card Collection,<br /> courtesy of the South End Historical Society, <br />Letter: August 19, 1851.</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><b><i>Boston, Aug.19, 1851</i></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">My dear Son,</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">I wrote you in June last, calculating for the overland mail from London on 6th July so as to meet you on arrival at Bombay with letters.&nbsp; Thomas &amp; Percy <b><i>[Otis’s two younger brothers]</i></b> wrote afterwards.&nbsp; On the 19 July [the] Brig <i>Ohio</i> arrived at Salem &amp; reported having spoken the <i>Equator</i><b><i>[the ship on which Otis had sailed]</i></b><i> </i>on 18 June Lat. 2 N., so you had made rather a long passage thus far.&nbsp; We were somewhat disappointed at not having a letter, but presume you did not board the <i>Ohio</i>.&nbsp; This letter I intend to send to meet the English mail of 6<span style="position: relative; top: -3pt;">th</span>&nbsp;September.&nbsp; I hope it will meet you immediately on your arrival at Calcutta.&nbsp; Something over 100 days have passed away since you sailed.&nbsp; We feel quite impatient to hear from you, but suppose [we] must wait patiently some sixty days or more.&nbsp; </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">The summer is now nearly ended, but has been quite a pleasant one, tho’ not much warm weather.&nbsp; For the last three weeks it has been very dry &amp; dusty.&nbsp; The street in front of our house <b><i>[Washington Street]</i></b> has been obstructed nearly three months.&nbsp; They have just finished laying a large drain thro’ the street &amp; most of the owners of estates have been cutting into it.&nbsp; Have now a capital drain to the cellar, so that if we have another high tide it may run off sooner than before (the water I mean).&nbsp; They have now commenced paving commencing at Dover <b><i>[now East Berkeley]</i></b><i> </i>St. &amp; going to Malden St., and we have had dust enough.&nbsp; Ramsey, the successor to John Rider comes every morning to water the street. <b><i>[Water wagons then were used to wet down gravel streets to alleviate dust]</i></b><i>.</i></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">Your mother &amp; myself propose going to Manataug <b><i>[a summer resort]</i></b> on Thursday to pass some 10 days or so.&nbsp; The Smiths have come up &amp; we are to have their rooms.&nbsp; Your uncle JDW &amp; his family, OCE &amp; his, Mr. Weld <b><i>[Daniel Weld, a wealthy elderly merchant, who lived with his daughter next door to the Everetts]</i></b> &amp; Martha are now there.&nbsp; They have passed the summer there &amp; had some splendid fishing.&nbsp; Tautog <b><i>[an edible fish, also called blackfish]</i></b> have been quite plenty.&nbsp; This afternoon we are going to Newton to ask Mary Clapp to go with us.&nbsp; She has never been at the sea coast.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">The dogs are quite lively (Snap &amp; Nelly).&nbsp; I sold Fanny to Geo. Fisher to take to the West for $15.&nbsp; Nelly has grown quite handsome &amp; is a little beauty.&nbsp; Snap is as wide awake as ever, tho’ for several days after you went away he was quite dull.&nbsp; He seems to like to have me talk to him about you and it really seems as if he understood what I say.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">Business is dull.&nbsp; The factories are making up with heavy losses.&nbsp; Money is tremendous tight.&nbsp; Calcutta goods have advanced in price.&nbsp; I hope that you will make a good voyage.&nbsp; I intend to send this by Europe on Wednesday 20 inst. so as to be in season.&nbsp; Tho’ if you have a long passage round from Bombay it will be rather old news, but the boys will write later.&nbsp; I must leave room for your mother.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Your aff. father,</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Otis Everett</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; font-family: inherit; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-X1JSY_LaQ1g/T7RJUN-obTI/AAAAAAAAA_I/QKfsCPb8C4s/s1600/img503.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="318" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-X1JSY_LaQ1g/T7RJUN-obTI/AAAAAAAAA_I/QKfsCPb8C4s/s400/img503.jpg" width="400" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Everett Letters, Richard O. Card Collection,<br /> courtesy of the South End Historical Society, <br />Exterior of letter: August 19, 1851.</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div style="font-family: inherit;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-X1JSY_LaQ1g/T7RJUN-obTI/AAAAAAAAA_I/QKfsCPb8C4s/s1600/img503.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><br /></a></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">Dear Otis,</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">It seems so pleasant to be once more addressing you; I only wish I could do it by voice.&nbsp; We have not yet become accustomed to your absence and something occurs every hour to recall you to memory, but we have not wanted for visitors this summer, although all the relatives and relations are out of town.&nbsp; There have been two deaths in Mr. Brigham’s house since his family went to Grafton. <b><i>[William Brigham was the Everetts’ next door neighbor on the north side.]</i></b><i> </i>&nbsp;They were a man and his child belonging to the family Mr. B. took there to look after the house in their absence; probably they have lived upon the green fruit in the yard.&nbsp; Flagg <b><i>[Jacob B. Flagg was a grocer who lived and worked directly across Washington Street from the Everetts]</i></b><i> </i>has moved to Roxbury and sold out his stock in the store to Mr. Johnson, who formerly kept with Mr. Clapp.&nbsp; Mr. Savage’s family have moved to Jamaica Plain.&nbsp; Father and I called to see them a few days since.&nbsp; They seem quite contented with their country home.&nbsp; Not many other changes have occurred in the neighborhood … All Aunt Rebecca’s family are in the country now excepting Uncle Henry.&nbsp; He was robbed a few nights ago by some one who entered the house whilst he was asleep and took his watch from over his bed and his wallet from his pants, which laid in a chair close by.&nbsp; He has not yet heard anything from them, and probably never will.&nbsp; The wallet contained 80 dollars.&nbsp; They entered by removing a square of glass in the kitchen.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;… Frank Darracott has bought a house in Ashburton Place, for which he gave 22,000 dollars, and James D. has gone into partnership with his father and moved to Woburn.&nbsp; The Fenno’s have all had the varioloid <b><i>[a mild form of smallpox]</i></b>, but I must stop, for I keep thinking of so many things to write that such a medley will I fear confuse you, and not aid you at all in getting your thoughts into proper trim for business. … I am counting the days and hours for a letter from you, and be sure you write minutely and by every opportunity, then you shall have the like done for you when your oldest son goes away from you.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Your ever affectionate mother,</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; E.L.E.</div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-16766381138218738382012-05-13T12:21:00.000-04:002012-05-13T12:23:32.921-04:00Boston Jazz History<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cycXleO0aTU/T6_cGt-_5dI/AAAAAAAAA-c/H-_oEOKA4Ks/s1600/Untitled.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cycXleO0aTU/T6_cGt-_5dI/AAAAAAAAA-c/H-_oEOKA4Ks/s400/Untitled.png" width="266" /></a></div>Last weekend I went to the book launch of <i>The Boston Jazz Chronicles </i>by Richard Vacca.&nbsp; The launch was held in the most appropriate place possible: <a href="http://wallyscafe.com/"><span style="color: blue;">Wally's Cafe</span>.</a>&nbsp; Wally's Cafe is the last remaining South End jazz club from the mid-twentieth century and Mr. Vacca discusses some of its history in his book.<br /><br />I went to the launch for a few reasons.&nbsp; I like Wally's, I like Mr. Vacca and <a href="http://www.troystreet.com/" style="color: blue;">Troy Street Publishing</a>, and I like most things related to Boston history.&nbsp; But the biggest reason was because the book discusses a lot of jazz clubs that were located in the South End.&nbsp; We've been working on a Walking Tour of South End nightlife for some time now and this book has proved to be an invaluable source of information.&nbsp; Mr. Vacca was kind enough to walk around with us and discuss some of the sites that we talk about in our walk.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Oh2hcdH6wOA/T6_dHINXVDI/AAAAAAAAA-k/jWYRFdVFBcY/s1600/2012-05-06+17.01.37.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Oh2hcdH6wOA/T6_dHINXVDI/AAAAAAAAA-k/jWYRFdVFBcY/s400/2012-05-06+17.01.37.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Richard Vacca speaking to a packed house at Wally's Cafe.</td></tr></tbody></table>So if you have an interest in jazz or in Boston or South End history, I encourage you to look at this book.&nbsp; You can purchase it on<span style="color: blue;"> </span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Boston-Jazz-Chronicles-Richard-Vacca/dp/0983991006"><span style="color: blue;">Amazon</span> </a>or go check it out from the BPL main branch or South End Branch library.&nbsp; I know the South End Branch ordered a copy so it should be there now or very soon.&nbsp; <br /><br />Mr. Vacca will also be speaking about his book on May 24th, a Thursday night, at 6:30pm at the Historical Society.&nbsp; He will be bringing copies of his book.&nbsp; If you'd like to attend, send an email to <a href="mailto:admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org">admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org</a> or call 617-536-4445 to sign up.&nbsp; <br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-55992361952405143812012-05-11T15:33:00.003-04:002012-05-12T20:50:45.218-04:00The Story Behind 512-518 Tremont Street<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8_JZJfFQhLk/T61g_Mk82XI/AAAAAAAAA9w/9suckDRsuyc/s1600/512+518.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="268" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8_JZJfFQhLk/T61g_Mk82XI/AAAAAAAAA9w/9suckDRsuyc/s400/512+518.JPG" width="400" /></a></div>You might have heard that the little one-story building at the corner of Tremont and Dwight Streets, seen at left, is slated for demolition.&nbsp; A new building with condos upstairs and commercial space on the ground floor will take its place.&nbsp; Demolition in historic districts is relatively rare.&nbsp; When it does occur it's usually because the building in question is beyond repair and is a danger to the public (as in the case of the<span style="color: blue;"> </span><a href="http://southend.patch.com/articles/photo-gallery-ivory-bean-building-demolished#photo-5756030" style="color: blue;">Ivory Bean House</a> early last year) or because the building is not historically and/or architecturally significant and a developer wants to tear it down and build something new (like the <a href="http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/south_end/2012/02/hold_ink_block_project_receive.html" style="color: blue;">Ink Block Project</a> and <a href="http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/south_end/2012/02/hold_six-story_development_pro.html" style="color: blue;">512-518 Tremont Street</a>).<br /><br /><br />Here are the bits and pieces of history that I could find about the lot at 512-518 Tremont Street, the building that stands there now, and the building that stood there before. <br /><br />When I first heard about the proposal to tear down the current building, I wanted to find out when it was built.&nbsp; I suspected that it was probably built in the early twentieth century but, given the history of the development of the South End, I thought that perhaps a nineteenth century building stood there before the current building.<br /><br />According to the deeds for the property, a housewright purchased this lot from the City of Boston in 1842.&nbsp; The first mortgage on the property appeared in 1847, indicating that a structure was probably built there at that time.&nbsp; By 1857, Joseph Carew, sculptor, is listed as the owner.<br /><br />The 1872 and 1875 Boston city directories indicate that Joseph and Henry Carew, brothers, operated a "statuary and monumental works" here.&nbsp; In 1892, Joseph Carew is listed in the directory as working on Gerard Street but the building on the corner of Dwight and Tremont is still listed as a monument works.<br /><br />Newspapers indicate that in the early twentieth century the space housed a series of restaurants and cafes and had residences above.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.blogger.com/goog_864332108" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="312" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-w256Dd83YMI/T61oMXj_geI/AAAAAAAAA-E/LDcrbSZ21IE/s400/odd+fellows+1932.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/5951020189/sizes/l/in/photostream/">Image courtesy of Boston Public Library.<br />1932, 512-518 in foreground on right.&nbsp; Odd Fellows Hall <br />burned in background.</a></td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><br /></td></tr></tbody></table>Then I stumbled on what I was looking for: permits reveal that in 1924, the owner of the property was "City Building Wrecking Co."&nbsp; They applied for permission to demolish a three-story brick building occupied by stores.&nbsp; This must have been what stood there before the one-story structure, although I can't find any pictures of the first three-story structure.&nbsp; Around the same time as the demolition of the three-story building, an application for a permit to build was filed by new owner Samuel Gold.&nbsp; He proposed a one story building to be used for commercial use only.&nbsp; It stated a desire to "use existing foundations" in the construction of the structure.&nbsp; This is the building that stands there now.<br /><br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XqtHiGIXtoc/T61nLf6uoYI/AAAAAAAAA98/SNtQxueG72U/s1600/518+tremont.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="277" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XqtHiGIXtoc/T61nLf6uoYI/AAAAAAAAA98/SNtQxueG72U/s400/518+tremont.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">512-518 Tremont St. 1972, South End Historical Society.</td></tr></tbody></table>Since 1924, the one story building has housed a First National Store, cafes, a White Castle Restaurant, the Gypsy Reading Room, living quarters (possibly illegally), Paul's Export Co., the Old Dover Tavern, the All-American Tailoring Co., and the G and N Restaurant, among many other things.&nbsp; Most recently the Old Dutch Cottage Candy store has called that building home.&nbsp; <br /><br />Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com5tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-6510319918478489342012-04-29T15:50:00.001-04:002012-04-29T15:50:29.682-04:00Walking Tours and Events for May and JuneThe South End Historical Society has several great lectures and walking tours coming up.&nbsp; Check them out below.&nbsp; If you would like to attend, please call 617-536-4445 or email admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org to sign up.&nbsp; Reservations are required.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-z6lAdZcHnig/T52amm0h48I/AAAAAAAAA8s/Co-N-GFDV4s/s1600/SEHS+May+Events.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="426" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-z6lAdZcHnig/T52amm0h48I/AAAAAAAAA8s/Co-N-GFDV4s/s640/SEHS+May+Events.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-itTWr9z0LmU/T52bSTwzNoI/AAAAAAAAA80/XZdFzOhGYUs/s1600/SEHS+June+Events.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="298" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-itTWr9z0LmU/T52bSTwzNoI/AAAAAAAAA80/XZdFzOhGYUs/s640/SEHS+June+Events.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br />Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-56342244858481857682012-04-24T20:02:00.000-04:002012-04-25T08:02:26.531-04:00Spring Newsletter and Events Calendar<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CCvEPj1xFNo/T5c40QFbmiI/AAAAAAAAA8Q/NEfc4-niH2o/s1600/2012-04-24+18.22.25.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CCvEPj1xFNo/T5c40QFbmiI/AAAAAAAAA8Q/NEfc4-niH2o/s400/2012-04-24+18.22.25.jpg" width="400" /></a></div>We released our <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/Newsletter.html" style="color: blue;">spring newsletter</a> today.&nbsp; In this issue, Vol. 40, No. 1: <br /><ul><li>Local historian and author Alison Barnet's article about South End police officer John Sacco's beat and South End News column.&nbsp; <br />See page 2.&nbsp; </li><li>"A South End Love Story" on page 5, which I also posted on this blog <a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/01/south-end-love-story.html" style="color: blue;">earlier this year.</a> </li><li>Our May and June events calendar on page 4.</li><li>My Executive Director letter on page 1.</li></ul><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-vBQa6AFB9F0/T5c6I_AqyvI/AAAAAAAAA8Y/bYbmwh3q_yg/s1600/Mask.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="165" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-vBQa6AFB9F0/T5c6I_AqyvI/AAAAAAAAA8Y/bYbmwh3q_yg/s200/Mask.JPG" width="200" /></a></div>We've been busy here at the <a href="http://southendhistoricalsociety.org/" style="color: blue;">SEHS</a> preparing for our <b>46th Annual Spring Ball, "A Venetian Masquerade," </b>scheduled for this Saturday, April 28th from 8pm to midnight at the Lenox Hotel.&nbsp; We have a great band, <a href="http://www.malloi.com/">Malloi</a>, delicious light fare and dessert, prizes for the most classic, elegant, and creative masks, and a silent auction with items from local restaurants, businesses, and cultural institutions.&nbsp;<br /><br />Visit our <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/programs.htm" style="color: blue;">website</a> for to purchase Masquerade tickets online or call 617-536-4445 to pay by check.&nbsp; Proceeds from our two annual fundraisers, the Spring Ball and the House Tour, fund one third of our annual operating budget and we could not continue without them.&nbsp; Come enjoy the event, make new friends, and support local history!&nbsp; <br /><br />I posted the picture above in honor of our early balls.&nbsp; It was taken at the 4th Annual Ball, February 1970, at the Franklin Square House on East Newton Street.&nbsp; Guests often wore Victorian costume to early balls and in the picture you can see the costumes worn by the two women on the left.&nbsp; Betty Gibson, founder of what is now <a href="http://www.gibsonsothebysrealty.com/">Gibson Sotheby's</a> International Realty and an early SEHS board member, is on the right.&nbsp;Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-31363160350012479932012-04-22T01:50:00.001-04:002012-04-22T10:52:05.384-04:00The Old Washington Street Elevated<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.blogger.com/goog_334980144" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="325" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-SZ02qkl7CU8/T5OWHMG81FI/AAAAAAAAA78/CNY01H2-Tck/s400/Elevated.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/6243977705/">The Washington Street Elevated, 1929. <br />Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection</a></td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/6243977705/" target="_blank"><br /></a></td></tr></tbody></table>Back in February, local South End historian and South End News contributor Alison Barnet wrote a great column about the old Elevated train on Washington Street.&nbsp; If you haven't read the article, go <a href="http://www.mysouthend.com/index.php?ch=columnists&amp;sc=south_end_character&amp;sc2=&amp;sc3=&amp;id=130014" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">here</a>.<br /><br />The "El," as it was known, ran from downtown Boston to Forest Hills and snaked its way down Washington Street in the South End until it was torn down in 1987.&nbsp; Some people decried the poor condition of the 80+ year old stations, claiming that the system was outdated and that the noise was a menace.&nbsp; Others had fonder memories of the "El" and lamented the loss of the connection between the communities that it provided.&nbsp; See part of the transcript from WGBH's coverage of the end of the "El" <a href="http://main.wgbh.org/ton/programs/5071_02.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">here</a> and note Byron Rushing's insightful comments.&nbsp; The <a href="http://www.jphs.org/transportation/orange-line-memories.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Jamaica Plain Historical Society blog</a> also has a great post about the "El."<br /><br />While the structure from Northampton Station, which stood near the intersection of Washington St. and Massachusetts Ave., was given to the <a href="http://www.trolleymuseum.org/collection/browse.php?id=NORTHXMA" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Seashore Trolley Museum</a> in 1988, I don't think other stations or pieces of the "El" survived in the public realm.&nbsp; People probably grabbed small pieces (bolts?) and snapped pictures as souvenirs but little else of the "El" survives.<br /><br />Luckily, footage of the "El" is posted on YouTube.&nbsp; As an added perk, there are some great shots of the South End.&nbsp;&nbsp; <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><object class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://0.gvt0.com/vi/PmyCLBKkzfA/0.jpg" height="266" width="320"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PmyCLBKkzfA&fs=1&source=uds" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PmyCLBKkzfA&fs=1&source=uds" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div><div style="text-align: center;">The video above, from 1986 or '87, shows a neat vista of Washington Street.&nbsp; If you're familiar with Washington Street today, pay close attention to this video and notice all of the new buildings that have gone up since this was filmed.&nbsp; The Hotel Alexandra is barely visible on the left at 3:18; and Cathedral of the Holy Cross at 4:34.&nbsp; Watch until the end and the entrance into the tunnel.</div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><object class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://0.gvt0.com/vi/c445QyIBh6A/0.jpg" height="266" width="320"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/c445QyIBh6A&fs=1&source=uds" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/c445QyIBh6A&fs=1&source=uds" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div><br />The video above shows some of the dismantling of the Elevated tracks in the late 1980s.&nbsp; 1:02 shows the tracks near Northampton Station coming down outside of 1701 Washington Street; 5:05 shows Cathedral of the Holy Cross; 5:12 shows Franklin Square; and 5:15 shows Hite Radio and T.V. (soon to be demolished) at the corner of Washington St. and Worcester Square.<br /><br />If you just can't get enough "El" history and have some time on your hands, check out this 28 minute documentary <a href="http://theelevated.org/" target="_blank">"The Fall and Rise of Boston's Elevated Subway."</a>&nbsp; There are some good images of some of the stations, especially Dover St. station.Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-35535508608244978862012-04-07T22:10:00.001-04:002012-04-09T17:55:58.836-04:00South End History, Part III: Urban Renewal<div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span><span style="font-size: small;"><i>continued from </i><a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/03/south-end-history-part-ii-bostons.html" target="_blank"><i>South End History, Part II: Boston's Melting Pot.</i></a></span><span style="font-size: small;">..</span></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;"></span></div><div style="font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><div style="color: black;"><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5p_4cElEga4/T30PMqqrSnI/AAAAAAAAA7A/HzwOWppp-7c/s1600/Renewal+Title.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="141" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5p_4cElEga4/T30PMqqrSnI/AAAAAAAAA7A/HzwOWppp-7c/s400/Renewal+Title.JPG" width="400" /></a></span></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><i>Daily Boston Globe</i> headline, October 1955, after<br />the demolition of the New York Streets neighborhood</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">In the 1950s, the city of Boston started to investigate the possibility of redeveloping certain neighborhoods that they believed were run down.&nbsp; Several potential sites were located in the South End.&nbsp; An urban renewal effort was going on throughout the United States and was encouraged by both the federal and local governments in many major cities.</span></div></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></div><span style="font-size: small;">The first area targeted for redevelopment in the South End was the neighborhood known as the New York Streets,&nbsp;the area between Harrison Ave., Albany Street, Dover (now East Berkeley) Street, and Motte (now Herald) Street.&nbsp; The Boston Housing Authority (the predecessor to the Boston Redevelopment Authority) issued a report on the condition of the New York Streets in&nbsp;June, 1952:</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">"The most cursory inspection of the New York Streets establishes it as a blighted and&nbsp; deteriorated neighborhood.&nbsp; The&nbsp;streets&nbsp;[are] inadequate for the demands of modern traffic...The land is occupied by an indiscriminate mixture of commercial uses of every type...with slum residential properties, or housing that is well on the down grade.&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size: small;">The neighborhood is disfigured by…openly-dumped garbage and other filth since any vestige of pride in the surroundings has long since been abandoned by the people there...The dingy houses…reveal cracked masonry, rickety entrance halls and stairways, and dirty interiors with falling plaster….The dirty streets in the whole area swarm with children and adults too, on fair days, since the blessings of sun and light - even in the dusty gusts of air - are preferable to confinement in the squalid buildings.&nbsp;&nbsp; Many of the businesses…are marginal in character.&nbsp; Some of them include the storage [and] sale…of food items, despite the fact that the neighborhood is rat infested.” </span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Rc-VqGXQIn8/T30QI8iOtfI/AAAAAAAAA7I/DXe5O8NJ0Ec/s1600/New+York+Streets+1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="544" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Rc-VqGXQIn8/T30QI8iOtfI/AAAAAAAAA7I/DXe5O8NJ0Ec/s640/New+York+Streets+1.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-size: small;">Hundreds of families lived in the New York Streets area, so called because the streets were named after places in New York State that a Boston railway line ran through: Troy, Rochester, Genesee, Oswego, Oneida, Seneca, and Rose (See Mark B.'s remark in the comment section below for detail about Rose Street).&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size: small;">Gloria Ganno, a former resident, recalled her time growing up in the New York Streets:</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">“When I was a child, automobile traffic was light, so neighborhood kids could easily roller skate on the street, play hopscotch on the sidewalk, and play baseball in three empty lots that at one time held three houses...On hot summer nights, we played “kick the can” and “hide and seek” in the dusk while our parents socialized on the stoops.</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; direction: ltr; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt; text-align: center; unicode-bidi: embed; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Italian bakery next door…emitted the scrumptious aroma of bread and cookies baking…and we could rarely resist buying a loaf fresh from the oven. The bakery also sold cold cuts and had big wheels of cheeses imported from Italy.&nbsp; On the next block was a Jewish bakery called </span><span style="font-size: small; font-style: italic;">Green Friedman’s</span><span style="font-size: small;">, where we bought bagels and pumpernickel and rye breads also hot from the oven.&nbsp; There were stores that sold fresh fruits and vegetables, meat and fish markets, and specialty stores catering to different ethnic groups….We never ate so well as when we lived in the New York streets. </span></div><div style="color: black; direction: ltr; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt; text-align: left; unicode-bidi: embed; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; direction: ltr; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt; text-align: center; unicode-bidi: embed; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-size: small;">During the mid-1950s, residents of the New York streets received a notice to move…[from] the Boston Housing Authority (BHA)…, Tillie sadly moved to Brookline. Although she was living in a more upscale place, she was lonely and missed her friends and her old neighborhood life. The elderly, the longest-time residents, seemed especially hit hard by the upheaval.”</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">The families who lived in the New York Streets were removed and rehoused, often in places far from the South End.&nbsp; The city razed the area in 1955 to begin the first large scale urban renewal project in Boston (the West End followed soon after).&nbsp; The Boston Herald building was built shortly afterward and occupies much of the site today.&nbsp; The site will probably be redeveloped once more in the very near future.&nbsp; The <a href="http://boston.curbed.com/places/the-ink-block" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Ink Block project</a>&nbsp;is investigating demolishing the Herald building, now vacant, and building&nbsp;mixed use commercial and residential buildings.</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Other examples of urban renewal in the South End include Cathedral Housing, Castle Square, Tent City, the brick blocks, and Villa Victoria.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">For Cathedral Housing, the BRA razed the existing structures on the site and built a housing development there in the 1950s to house WWII veterans and their families.&nbsp; In the early 1960s, residents of the <a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2011/12/why-is-castle-square-called-castle.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Castle Square</a> neighborhood were evicted and their buildings destroyed.&nbsp; Debates about proposed redevelopment for the area ensued and eventually an affordable housing block was built on the site.&nbsp; The result, Castle Square apartments, still stands there today.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WtoPVTFh6VE/T30Q9ORVOgI/AAAAAAAAA7Q/xYVTASCIoWU/s1600/Tent+City.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="225" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WtoPVTFh6VE/T30Q9ORVOgI/AAAAAAAAA7Q/xYVTASCIoWU/s400/Tent+City.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Tent City, corner of Dartmouth and Columbus, Google Map</td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">During this period, many South End residents feared that urban renewal would lead to higher property values and that the city was not guaranteeing enough affordable housing.&nbsp; They feared that they would be pushed out of the South End.&nbsp; Some organized and fought for affordable housing.&nbsp; A famous example is Tent City, a housing development on the corner of Dartmouth Street and Columbus Avenue.&nbsp; The city cleared the area of buildings in 1968 with the intention of constructing a parking garage.&nbsp; Frustrated with the lack of assistance by the city for people being displaced by urban renewal projects and the lack of attention to the need for affordable housing in the South End, protestors occupied the lot, pitched tents, and camped there for three days.&nbsp; The protestors won, but not without a long and drawn out battle.&nbsp; The city did build affordable housing on the site and opened it...in <i>1988</i>, twenty years after the initial protest.&nbsp; But nonetheless, the building was christened Tent City in honor of the efforts there in 1968.</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9r7W7CuWFu4/T30RBWe0SKI/AAAAAAAAA7Y/wXAj2fHhFVw/s1600/Villa+Victoria.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="242" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9r7W7CuWFu4/T30RBWe0SKI/AAAAAAAAA7Y/wXAj2fHhFVw/s400/Villa+Victoria.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Villa Victoria, Google Map</td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">Affordable housing was also built in several other places.&nbsp; Large brick buildings like Concord House and Methunion occupy long blocks on Washington Street, Columbus Avenue, and Tremont Street.&nbsp; Another famous example of organized protest is Villa Victoria, which takes up several blocks around West Dedham St. and West Brookline St. in between Shawmut Ave. and Tremont St.&nbsp; The city wanted to tear down the buildings and rehouse the tenants elsewhere.&nbsp; The residents, a predominantly Puerto Rican population, organized in protest and fought and won the right to design a new housing development on the site.&nbsp; Villa Victoria, an award-winning urban design, was the result.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">What else was happening at this time?</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">The city of Boston wanted economic revitalization and encouraged new development throughout Boston, not just in the South End.&nbsp; They approved the construction of the new Prudential Center and other new Back Bay buildings.&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size: small;">The South End's proximity to downtown Boston and the Back Bay made it an attractive residential location for urban pioneers moving into the city in the early 1960s.&nbsp; Urban renewal and economic revitalization led to rising property values, evident today in the city and in its immediate environs.</span><br /><br /></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Where does the South End Historical Society (SEHS) come in?</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o1hUngHQByU/T30R5MWkXrI/AAAAAAAAA7g/HaZtH2Qy4sw/s1600/1677-1641washington.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="277" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o1hUngHQByU/T30R5MWkXrI/AAAAAAAAA7g/HaZtH2Qy4sw/s400/1677-1641washington.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">1972 image of Washington Street, courtesy of the <br />South End Historical Society.</td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-size: small;">The SEHS formed in 1966 to preserve the South End's Victorian rowhouses and other historic architecture.&nbsp; In 1972, the SEHS filed an application to place the South End district on the National Register of Historic Places.&nbsp; They were successful.&nbsp; The application included about 3,000 images of South End buildings, which the SEHS retains in its collections.</span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></div><div style="color: black; font-family: Georgia,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">In addition, in the mid-1970s, the SEHS and other South End residents filed an application with the city of Boston to make the South End a Boston Landmark District.&nbsp; In 1983, the city officially established the South End Landmark District and appointed a commission to oversee and enforce the district guidelines.&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-64430645803538419812012-03-21T10:26:00.000-04:002012-03-21T19:21:00.508-04:00Upcoming Boston Area History Events<div style="font-family: inherit;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7XtqhUYY5Nc/T2nh-_BrP_I/AAAAAAAAA6Q/CeAcYT3mXfg/s1600/night_burlesque_fundraiser_small.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7XtqhUYY5Nc/T2nh-_BrP_I/AAAAAAAAA6Q/CeAcYT3mXfg/s200/night_burlesque_fundraiser_small.jpg" width="135" /></a><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lXEBAIYrwL4/T2nhd6-C21I/AAAAAAAAA6I/3hyya-78kVs/s1600/img+2.+532+Mass.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lXEBAIYrwL4/T2nhd6-C21I/AAAAAAAAA6I/3hyya-78kVs/s200/img+2.+532+Mass.jpg" width="126" /></a>There are several upcoming history related events in the Boston area.&nbsp; Below are just a few that crossed my desk in the last couple of weeks.&nbsp; I'll be attending some of them and you should too.&nbsp; Support your local historical societies, museums, and other cultural institutions!</div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><a href="http://thewestendmuseum.org/index.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">The West End Museum</a> has a number of great events coming up. &nbsp;Visit their website <a href="http://thewestendmuseum.org/upcoming.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">here</a> for more information. &nbsp;They have exhibits about preservation in Boston, walking tours, and lectures about West End history, costumes and burlesque (image at right), and urban renewal. &nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><b>Wednesday, March 28th</b></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8CwExt8i-wg/T2nJNZeQZTI/AAAAAAAAA54/9RK37tVxoxE/s1600/Klein+cover.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8CwExt8i-wg/T2nJNZeQZTI/AAAAAAAAA54/9RK37tVxoxE/s320/Klein+cover.JPG" width="214" /></a></div>The <a href="http://www.bostonpreservation.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Boston Preservation Alliance's</a> Meet the Author series presents Christopher Klein, author of <i>Discovering the Boston Harbor Islands </i>(cover at right)<i>.&nbsp; </i>Where: Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, at 5:30pm.&nbsp; The author will take you "on a virtual tour through the colorful history and natural beauty of one of our best-kept local secrets during...[the Alliance's] first 'Meet the Authors' series, presented in collaboration with Old South Meeting House.&nbsp; Hear tales of ghosts, shipwrecks, prisoners of war, and Revolutionary War battles that took place on 'the real Shutter Islands' and get inspired to leave port and visit this urban oasis." </div><div class="event_description" style="font-family: inherit;">Admission is free for Boston Preservation Alliance and Old South Meeting House members; $10 for non-members.</div><div style="font-family: inherit;">Visit <a href="http://www.bostonpreservation.org/programs/upcoming-events.html#BostonHarborIslands" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">here</a> to sign up!<br /><br /><b>Thursday, March 29th</b><br />The focus of the Old South Meeting House's winter and spring "Middays at the Meeting House" series is the history of Boston's neighborhoods.&nbsp; A different Boston neighborhood is highlighted each week and on March 29th Charlestown is the focus.&nbsp; From OSMH's website: "<span class="style40">Rebuilt after it was burned by the British following the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, and annexed to Boston in 1874, today Charlestown is home to extraordinary historical architecture; major national landmarks and a new generation of immigrants and young professionals that have joined its traditionally Irish-American population. </span> <span class="style2"> Carl Zellner</span>, Historian of the Charlestown Historical Society, explores the city’s oldest neighborhood, which today is a thriving 21st Century community. $6; Free for OSMH Members."&nbsp; The event starts at 12:15pm at the OSMH, 310 Washington Street.&nbsp; See their <a href="http://osmh.org/osmh_123456789files/calender.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="color: blue;">website</span></a> for details.&nbsp;<br /><br /><abbr class="dtstart" title="2011-10-16T13:00:00-04:00"><span class="style40"></span></abbr></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><b>Friday, March 30th</b></div><div style="font-family: inherit;">Tenants' Development Corporation will be hosting <b>"Sharing Our Stories"</b> in collaboration with the <a href="http://www.massart.edu/About_MassArt/MassArt_In_the_Community/Center_for_Art_and_Community_Partnerships.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Center for Art and Community Partnerships</a> from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.&nbsp; The flyer reads: "Seasoned Citizens" share their personal narratives of life in the South End- Then and Now- in a dramatic and humorous presentation."&nbsp; The event will have an art and photo display, Q &amp; A, refreshments, a raffle, and special guests.&nbsp; It is Friday, March 30th, from 6 to 9pm at the Harriet Tubman House, 566 Columbus Avenue.&nbsp; The event is free.&nbsp; RSVP needed.&nbsp; Please contact Ekua Holmes at 617-780-9765 or at ekua.holmes@massart.edu or Arnesse Brown at 617-291-7307 or at abrown@tenantsdevelopment.com to sign up!</div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><b>Wednesday, April 4th</b></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"></div><div style="font-family: inherit;">The <a href="http://www.bostonpreservation.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Boston Preservation Alliance</a>’s 2012 Auction &amp; Gala will be held at State Street Pavilion at Fenway Park at 5:30pm in association with the ballpark’s centennial celebrations.&nbsp; Enjoy live and silent auctions featuring: travel packages, tickets to cultural and sporting events, gift certificates to Boston’s finest restaurants and historic hotels, and novelties related to preservation.&nbsp; All proceeds support the Alliance’s advocacy efforts and help to sustain our education programs in the city’s underserved communities. To purchase tickets and for a preview of auction items, click <a href="http://www.bostonpreservation.org/programs/gala-auction.html" style="color: blue;">here</a><span style="color: blue;">.</span></div><div style="font-family: inherit;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><b>Thursday, April 5th</b></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Jfywagup8XI/T2nihV0yC4I/AAAAAAAAA6Y/DNAdqZZgq58/s1600/Gibson+baseball.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="249" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Jfywagup8XI/T2nihV0yC4I/AAAAAAAAA6Y/DNAdqZZgq58/s320/Gibson+baseball.JPG" width="320" /></a></div>On Thursday, April 5th, the <a href="http://www.thegibsonhouse.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Gibson House</a><i> </i>will present <b>Victorian Baseball in Boston</b>.&nbsp; From their website: "the evening will feature discussions on the early baseball rules, the Boston-New York rivalry, the first Boston dynasties and the poetry of baseball.&nbsp; Festivities begin at 5:30 p.m. with a cocktail hour of beer and hot dogs at the Gibson House Museum, located across the street from Fisher College. The program gets underway at 6:45 p.m at Fisher College, 118 Beacon Street. Heading the list of panelists will be Bill Nowlin, author of more than 30 Red Sox-related books. Larry McCray...the coordinator of 'Project Protoball,' a record of print references to baseball prior to 1860, will also be on hand. Filling out the panel will be Joanne Hulbert, co-chair of SABR’s Music and Poetry Committee and a distant relative of William A. Hulbert, one of the founders of the National League.&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: inherit;">Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door, with a special $10 admission for members of the Gibson House Museum, SABR, the Boston Braves Historical Society, the Boston Preservation Alliance, the Ayer Mansion, the Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay, the South End Historical Society, and the Victorian Society.<br /><i>To purchase tickets online visit <a href="http://www.thegibsonhouse.org/events.asp" style="color: blue;">www.thegibsonhouse.org/events.asp</a> or call to reserve a space at 617-267-6338</i><b>&nbsp;</b> </div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: inherit;"><br /></div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-9019141680857351072012-03-20T13:51:00.004-04:002012-03-20T14:40:08.285-04:00South End History, Part II: Boston's Melting Pot<br /><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: small;"><i>...continued from <a href="http://www.southendhistory.org/2012/02/south-end-history-part-i-new-south-end.html" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">South End History, Part I: The “New” South End</a></i></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.blogger.com/goog_1652823862" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-3-vErY-u89g/T2jCdae-NxI/AAAAAAAAAaA/svdXwCpBPy0/s400/BPL+early+20th.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Image courtesy of Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection. </td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.blogger.com/goog_1652823862"><br /></a></td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><br /></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div class="MsoNormal">Most of the rowhouses in the South End did not remain single-family homes for long.&nbsp; A few major events occurred that were partly responsible for a major demographic change in the South End.&nbsp; In 1872, the <a href="http://damrellsfire.com/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Great Fire of Boston</a> tore through much of the city’s commercial and warehouse district in what is today’s Financial District (and Boston’s “old” South End).&nbsp; Many merchants, South Enders included, lost their warehouse stock and business locations in this fire.&nbsp; In addition, the Financial Panic of 1873 struck the United States, causing widespread bank failures.&nbsp; By this time, some Bostonians were ruined, some wanted to move to the newly filled and developed Back Bay to the north and northwest of the South End, and some wanted to take advantage of improved commuter transportation to live further outside of the city.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">So what happened in the South End?</div><div class="MsoNormal">Many families left the neighborhood and property values in the area decreased as demand for rowhouses decreased.&nbsp; Tens of thousands of immigrants entered Boston in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and took advantage of the abundance of housing becoming available in the South End.&nbsp; In addition, many young men and women and young married couples from the suburbs or the countryside moved in to the city looking for employment.&nbsp; To supply this demand, many rowhouses were converted to rooming houses, sheltering several families or individuals instead of one family.&nbsp; By 1900, 85% of the rowhouses in the South End were being used as rooming houses, most of which remained rooming houses until well into the mid-twentieth century.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">Who was living in the South End?</div><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vQlJed_q35I/T2i2jTSHyiI/AAAAAAAAATI/LgFTKharPu4/s1600/Wood+Book.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="282" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vQlJed_q35I/T2i2jTSHyiI/AAAAAAAAATI/LgFTKharPu4/s400/Wood+Book.JPG" width="400" /></a>By the late nineteenth century, the South End housed people from all over the world.&nbsp; Americans, British and British Canadians, Irish immigrants, Jews, Blacks, Germans, and Italians appear on Robert Woods’ map (at left) of ethnic enclaves in the South End in his 1898 study <i>A City Wilderness</i>.&nbsp; By the early twentieth century, large groups of Lebanese, Eastern Europeans, Polish, and Puerto Rican immigrants had also moved into the South End.&nbsp; E.C Dorion’s 1915 study, <i>The Redemption of the South End, </i>states that:</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 0.5in;">“The largest single factor of the population is Irish, with the Jews second.&nbsp; There are also a large number of British-Americans and Negroes.&nbsp; Side by side with these live, in lesser numbers, but in no insignificant groups by any means, English, German, Scotch, Italian, Greek, Syrian, Scandinavian, French, Austrian, and Armenian.&nbsp; The section also has its Chinatown.&nbsp; In some of the schools every European nation is represented.”</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4bTMT0zrWo0/T2i25sX_NII/AAAAAAAAATQ/eZ5fdjpC4Jg/s1600/Globe+Excerpt.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="256" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4bTMT0zrWo0/T2i25sX_NII/AAAAAAAAATQ/eZ5fdjpC4Jg/s400/Globe+Excerpt.JPG" width="400" /></a>The <i>Boston Daily Globe</i>ran an article in 1907 featuring places in the city where immigrants could go to learn.&nbsp; The article, at right, featured two South End institutions: the Free Trade School for Girls on Massachusetts Avenue and the Boston English High and Latin Schools on Montgomery Street.&nbsp; The McKinley School stands at the English High and Latin site today.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">Many immigrant families and poor South Enders needed charitable assistance and could visit places like the Union Rescue at 1-3 Dover Street (renamed East Berkeley Street in the mid-1960s).&nbsp; Settlement houses in the South End also provided assistance and neighborhood services for South End families.&nbsp; They ran many community programs, including boys’ and girls’ clubs, summer camps, arts and crafts classes, English classes, and music classes.&nbsp; The first South End settlement house was founded by Robert Woods in 1891 and several others opened in the last nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.&nbsp; In the 1950s, the remaining settlement houses united to form South End Settlements and in 1960 became <a href="http://www.uses.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">United South End Settlements</a>, which still exists today.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">Where might a South Ender go for entertainment?<span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal">They might visit the Gettysburg or Bunker Hill Cycloramas in the late nineteenth century, or one of <a href="http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=6972964519382606043" name="_GoBack"></a>several theaters, like the Columbia Theater on the corner of Washington and Motte (Herald today) Streets, Castle Square Theater (where the <a href="http://home.arlboston.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Animal Rescue League</a> stands today), the National Theater (where the <a href="http://www.bcaonline.org/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Boston Center for the Arts Calderwood Pavilion</a>stands today), or the Puritan Theater near the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Washington Street.&nbsp; </div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">In the mid-twentieth century, they could also visit one of many Big Band or Jazz clubs in the South End like the Hi-Hat on the corner of Columbus Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue.&nbsp; Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and Billie Holiday were among the many to perform here.&nbsp; This building burned down in 1959.&nbsp; The Harriet Tubman House stands there today and houses United South End Settlements.&nbsp; Malcolm Little, also known as Malcolm X, used to hang out outside the Savoy Club, near the present day Massachusetts Avenue Orange Line MBTA stop and currently occupied by a barbershop.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.wallyscafe.com/" style="color: blue;" target="_blank">Wally’s Café</a> was also a popular club.&nbsp; Founded in 1947 by Barbadian immigrant Joseph Walcott, this club is the only mid-twentieth century jazz club remaining in the South End.&nbsp; Wally, as Joseph Walcott was known, died in 1998 at the age of 101.&nbsp; His daughter and grandchildren operate the club today.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">In the 1950s, Boston started to investigate the possibility of rehabilitating certain districts that they thought were run-down with the intention of redeveloping those areas for commercial and residential space.&nbsp; Several potential sites were located in the South End.&nbsp; An urban renewal effort was going on all over the country and was encouraged by both the federal and local governments in many major cities.&nbsp; </div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">Coming soon: South End History, Part III: Urban Renewal... </div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-56027629868522605612012-02-26T14:54:00.000-05:002012-02-26T14:54:42.539-05:00South End History, Part I: The "New" South End<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument></xml><![endif]--> <br /><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hJpK_4I1fFw/T0pUWv6YEAI/AAAAAAAAAR0/rM_G_Ah8noA/s1600/SEnd+map.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hJpK_4I1fFw/T0pUWv6YEAI/AAAAAAAAAR0/rM_G_Ah8noA/s320/SEnd+map.JPG" width="305" /></a>This post is adapted from lectures I gave in February 2012 at both the <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/">South End Historical Society</a> and at the <a href="http://www.oldsouthmeetinghouse.org/default.aspx">Old South Meeting House</a>.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Ksv_9D05of4/T0pYbEB5DmI/AAAAAAAAAR8/WSH_UcAmOZ8/s1600/SE+Map+2.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="519" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Ksv_9D05of4/T0pYbEB5DmI/AAAAAAAAAR8/WSH_UcAmOZ8/s640/SE+Map+2.JPG" width="640" /></a>For those of you who might not be familiar with Boston's South End neighborhood, you can see it in relation to the rest of the city on the map on the left.<span> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">The image below shows a closer view of the South End neighborhood.<span>&nbsp; </span>This map shows the boundaries of the South End Landmark District, the area of the South End whose historic architecture is protected by the city of Boston.<span> </span>&nbsp;<span> The orange star marks the Historical Society office.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span></span>Until the early 19<sup>th</sup>century, the South End that we know today was a sort of no-man’s land between the main part of Boston on the Shawmut Peninsula and the town of Roxbury on the mainland.<span>&nbsp; </span>The term "South End" referred to the southern part of town.<span>&nbsp; </span>And the southernmost portion of Boston before the early to mid 19<sup>th</sup> century was the area of Franklin, Summer, and Milk Streets.<span>&nbsp; </span>Hence the name Old <i>South</i> Meeting House, which today is smack in the middle of downtown.<span>&nbsp; </span>So before the early 19<sup>th</sup> century, when the South End of today was mostly uninhabited, Bostonians referred to the South End as the area that encompasses today's Financial District<span>.&nbsp; As we will see, </span>as the city’s geographic boundaries changed, so did the idea of what area made up the South End.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Q3wCxVZHXMM/T0qIp3AysnI/AAAAAAAAASs/SP4OejEI_x0/s1600/leventhal+3.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Q3wCxVZHXMM/T0qIp3AysnI/AAAAAAAAASs/SP4OejEI_x0/s400/leventhal+3.JPG" width="315" /></a><span>So when did the South End of today appear?&nbsp; First, we need to understand a bit about Boston's made land.</span>&nbsp; The Shawmut Peninsula ("original" Boston) was connected to the mainland and Roxbury by a long isthmus, the Neck, along which ran a main road, today’s Washington Street.&nbsp; The map to the left depicts the original outline of Boston in light gray with a blue arrow indicating the location of the Neck.&nbsp; The narrowest part of the neck, around the point where the blue arrow is, is where Washington and East Berkeley Streets intersect today.&nbsp; The orange star marks the approximate location of the Faneuil Hall area.&nbsp; <span></span>&nbsp;</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">In 1801, the town selectmen, including Charles Bulfinch, presented a plan to develop some of the necklands (in light gray near the blue arrow and to the South) between the main part of Boston and Roxbury.<span>&nbsp; </span>The newly laid out area was mean to attract freestanding construction and houses surrounded by gardens and grounds.<span>&nbsp; </span>However, few people purchased these lots and by the late 1820s, the city of Boston reevaluated the development of the Neck.&nbsp; They planned more streets and divided the blocks into smaller parcels, hoping to attract a wider demographic with smaller and less expensive lot prices.&nbsp; By the 1840s, as foreign immigration to Boston increased, the population of the city grew dramatically and tenement housing began to dominate.&nbsp; The city worried that its middle and upper-middle class tax base would leave for the suburbs.&nbsp; In the late 1840s, they decided to turn the necklands into a rowhouse district to entice these families to stay within the city limits.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">At the same time, and in phases, the town (which became a city in 1822) began making land around the Neck to increase the available land mass.<span>&nbsp; The above map</span> shows the original shorelines of Boston in light gray.&nbsp; The dark gray indicates made land.<span>&nbsp; The land around the neck was filled first and then in 1857, the city continued to make land to the north of the South End, creating the Back Bay.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--yyiqmZxQZs/T0qI3BdAElI/AAAAAAAAAS0/hOtMp_EOcD0/s1600/leventhal+4.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--yyiqmZxQZs/T0qI3BdAElI/AAAAAAAAAS0/hOtMp_EOcD0/s400/leventhal+4.JPG" width="311" /></a></div><div class="MsoNormal">As people started to settle on the Neck and commercial enterprise took over much of the Milk, Franklin, Summer, and Devonshire Street area (today’s Financial District), Bostonians started to refer to the area of new development around the Neck as the South End because it became the most southerly neighborhood in Boston.<span>&nbsp; </span>Remember that Roxbury was not annexed into Boston until 1868.<span>&nbsp; The map to the left shows the new South End in relation to the rest of the city.&nbsp; This is the map of the landmark district that you saw above superimposed onto the map of Boston's made land.&nbsp; I drew the original shoreline of the neck on to the landmark district map to give you an idea of how much of the South End is built on made land.&nbsp; As you can see, the Back Bay is almost entirely made land.&nbsp; The orange star marks the Historical Society office.</span></div><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-u1zTD1ANqQk/T0p_22aFWlI/AAAAAAAAASk/UpH-tCvlksk/s1600/BPL+sleighing+on+the+neck.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="246" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-u1zTD1ANqQk/T0p_22aFWlI/AAAAAAAAASk/UpH-tCvlksk/s400/BPL+sleighing+on+the+neck.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Image courtesy of the <a href="http://www.bpl.org/">Boston Public Library</a>.&nbsp; See <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/5415321677/sizes/l/in/photostream/">link</a> to their Flickr page.</td><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><br /></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">Who lived in the new South End?<span>&nbsp; </span>There was some settlement on the neck before the mid-19th century rowhouse era, although it was scattered.<span>&nbsp; </span>Some early houses include the Porter Houses, the Allen House, and the Deacon House.&nbsp; The Porter Houses were built on the corner of Washington Street and East Springfield Street in 1806.<span>&nbsp; </span>The Allen House at Worcester Square and Washington Street was built in 1859.&nbsp; Both the Porter Houses and the Allen House are condominium buildings today.<span>&nbsp; </span>The Deacon House (image at left) was built in 1848, also on Washington Street, and no longer exists.<span>&nbsp; </span>However, part of the rear wall of the house can be seen embedded in the building that stands at the site.<span>&nbsp; </span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">After the rowhouse plan took effect, the city laid out three residential style squares in 1850-1851: Chester Square (on Massachusetts Avenue today between Tremont St. and Shawmut Ave.), Worcester Square, and Union Park.<span>&nbsp; </span>These squares feature rowhouses laid out around a central green space with a fountain.<span>&nbsp; </span>Most of the buildings on these squares were built in the 1850s.<span>&nbsp; </span>In general, upper-middle class families, many involved in commercial enterprise, lived in most of the houses on the squares.<span>&nbsp; </span>Other South End streets were also developed into rowhouse streets, housing upper-middle and middle class families.<span>&nbsp; </span>Working class families also lived in the district.<span>&nbsp; </span>Their homes were usually on narrower streets located closer to downtown.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span><i><b>Coming soon: South End History, Part II: Boston's Melting Pot. </b></i></span></div><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt;"><br /></span>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-24940525008175575902012-02-13T09:58:00.001-05:002012-02-13T09:58:08.064-05:00Some South End Images: PostcardsA few years ago, the SEHS received a donation of several dozen South End postcards.&nbsp; Most date from the early 20th century.&nbsp; Some were never sent but many have writing, notes, and postmarks on the back- city visitors or residents describing something or sending a note to their family members or friends.<br /><br />I've posted some of the postcards for your enjoyment on this chilly Monday.<br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" height="576" style="float: right; text-align: center; width: 312px;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-_o7oXGHNBTM/TzgJ7Fq3dBI/AAAAAAAAAQU/-FQ6diYALXA/s1600/Beal%2BNurses%2BHome.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" height="640" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708323438431007762" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-_o7oXGHNBTM/TzgJ7Fq3dBI/AAAAAAAAAQU/-FQ6diYALXA/s640/Beal%2BNurses%2BHome.JPG" style="display: block; height: 400px; margin-top: 0px; text-align: center; width: 254px;" width="406" /></a></td></tr><tr align="justify"><td class="tr-caption"><span style="font-size: small;">The postcard above shows the Beal Nurses' Home and Registry at 406 Massachusetts Avenue.&nbsp; I believe that they rented rooms in this building, known as the Palmerston.&nbsp; Today, the old Savoy building (a barbershop now) and part of a Tenants' Development Corporation building occupy the site.&nbsp;</span> </td></tr></tbody></table><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CqlFNPZTZAQ/TzgJzIn8iPI/AAAAAAAAAP8/E5_PYSu3mNc/s1600/2nd%2BUniversalist%2BChurch%2B1872.JPG"></a><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CqlFNPZTZAQ/TzgJzIn8iPI/AAAAAAAAAP8/E5_PYSu3mNc/s1600/2nd%2BUniversalist%2BChurch%2B1872.JPG"></a><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" height="550" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left; width: 269px;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-KsZ-hqTI_K4/TzgJ26kIxFI/AAAAAAAAAQI/qrglGKDKDzA/s1600/37%2BWest%2BNewton%2BInterior.JPG" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708323366730515538" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-KsZ-hqTI_K4/TzgJ26kIxFI/AAAAAAAAAQI/qrglGKDKDzA/s1600/37%2BWest%2BNewton%2BInterior.JPG" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">The postcard above shows a room in a lodging house at 37 West Newton Street.&nbsp; The postmark on the back of the card reads 1912 and the note reads "Dear Eva, Please give me your dress-maker's address.&nbsp; Josephine has been very sick with measles. Call in and don't be such a stranger. Your Friend, Mrs. Fitzgerald."</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" height="316" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center; width: 651px;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DIp_6eXl8ZQ/TzgJpNjFYSI/AAAAAAAAAPk/8hbw9drefiA/s1600/Tremont%2BMethodist%2B1912.JPG" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" height="250" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708323131308204322" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DIp_6eXl8ZQ/TzgJpNjFYSI/AAAAAAAAAPk/8hbw9drefiA/s400/Tremont%2BMethodist%2B1912.JPG" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">This image, taken about 1912, shows Tremont Street Methodist Church, now New Hope Baptist Church, on Tremont Street between Worcester and West Concord Streets.&nbsp; </span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" height="387" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center; width: 653px;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9MPRdQbdUok/TzgFf0VGV0I/AAAAAAAAAPY/3L7wcysmYp0/s1600/img444.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" height="247" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708318571873326914" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9MPRdQbdUok/TzgFf0VGV0I/AAAAAAAAAPY/3L7wcysmYp0/s400/img444.jpg" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">T</span><span style="font-size: small;">his group of women is standing outside of the Trade School for Girls, located at 618-620 Massachusetts Avenue.&nbsp; The Dunkin' Donuts parking lot occupies most of this space today.&nbsp; This image dates to about 1917.&nbsp; The note on the back is addressed to "Miss Mabel S. Long, 290 Lincoln St. Allston, Massachusetts" and reads "We are glad you like your work so much.&nbsp; Thank you for writing.&nbsp; Have you a kit that belongs to our set or where did you leave it?&nbsp; Come back and see us when you are through work.&nbsp; F.E.L."</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" border="0" height="246" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708323235340698642" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QimMglAyjow/TzgJvRGXRBI/AAAAAAAAAPw/c3wrqYapP2A/s400/Columbus%2Band%2BMass%2BAve%2B1913.JPG" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" width="400" /></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">This is one of my favorite images of the South End.&nbsp; This postcard shows the corner of Columbus and Massachusetts Ave., looking east.&nbsp; The building on the corner houses a market in this image and later became the home of the Hi-Hat club, a well-known center of South End and Boston nightlife.&nbsp; Fire destroyed the building and Hi-Hat in 1959.&nbsp; United South End Settlements' Harriet Tubman House stands there today. </span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" border="0" height="400" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708318458440909458" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QgSVAdXCCw8/TzgFZNwtApI/AAAAAAAAAPM/15KPIpj4_dw/s400/img445.jpg" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" width="250" /></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Columbia Theatre stood at 978-986 Washington Street at the intersection with Motte Street (Herald Street today) until it was demolished in 1957.&nbsp; Built in 1827 as the South Congregational Church, it became a theater in 1891.&nbsp; The theatre showed dramas, burlesque, vaudeville, silent movies, and talkies.&nbsp; <br />The Herald building stands there today- <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=herald+and+washington+st+boston+ma&amp;ll=42.346492,-71.064441&amp;spn=0.000967,0.001725&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hnear=Washington+St+%26+Herald+St,+Boston,+Suffolk,+Massachusetts&amp;gl=us&amp;t=m&amp;z=19&amp;layer=c&amp;cbll=42.346612,-71.064599&amp;panoid=iGNyCuRjM6mcU4Z_H4Tq7g&amp;cbp=12,158.64,,0,-9.8">see here</a>.</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" height="322" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center; width: 412px;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YHiS1wkWW2w/TzgFHXNaKGI/AAAAAAAAAO0/v61_hFMXXMw/s1600/img446.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708318151739582562" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YHiS1wkWW2w/TzgFHXNaKGI/AAAAAAAAAO0/v61_hFMXXMw/s400/img446.jpg" style="display: block; height: 256px; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; width: 400px;" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">A performance at the Columbia (the outside of the building is pictured in the postcard above this one).</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-rsppC9bEGXw/TzgFCZZyyUI/AAAAAAAAAOo/B07hlAPzQnc/s1600/img447.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708318066429053250" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-rsppC9bEGXw/TzgFCZZyyUI/AAAAAAAAAOo/B07hlAPzQnc/s400/img447.jpg" style="display: block; height: 248px; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; width: 400px;" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Union Rescue, pictured above in 1908, was located at 1-3 Dover Street near the corner of Tremont and Dover (now East Berkeley) Streets.&nbsp; The back of this postcard is addressed to "Mrs. George Morrison, 64 West Main Street, Marlboro Mass." and says "A word home all O.K. Have eaten the (nameless) that George gave me and we liked it very much.&nbsp; Baby is a different child.&nbsp; I don't have to pay any attention to him he is so happy.&nbsp; Hope you have a pleasant vacation.&nbsp; Hastily, Minnie"</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Yp1a1EeJ-tk/TzgE46pNdlI/AAAAAAAAAOc/N0Z4AVrbdRU/s1600/img448.jpg" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img alt="" border="0" height="250" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5708317903553394258" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Yp1a1EeJ-tk/TzgE46pNdlI/AAAAAAAAAOc/N0Z4AVrbdRU/s400/img448.jpg" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center;" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: small;">Castle Square Theater stood at the corner of Ferdinand (now Arlington), Tremont, and Castle (now Herald) Streets.&nbsp; Before Castle Square Theater, the Bunker Hill Cyclorama was built here in 1888 and welcomed visitors until it shut down in 1889.&nbsp; The circular Cyclorama building remained, housing the Garden Theater Arena in 1892 and then a riding club.&nbsp; Most of the building was demolished to make way for the new Castle Square Theater in 1894.&nbsp; The theater was renamed Arlington Theater in 1919 and then returned to the name Castle Square in 1925.&nbsp; The building was torn down in 1933.&nbsp; The Animal Rescue League moved into its new building on the site in 1956</span>.&nbsp; </td></tr></tbody></table><br />Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-21988089427701904052012-02-12T13:51:00.006-05:002012-02-12T14:12:00.654-05:00Upcoming Program: "South End History: An Overview"Want to know more about South End history?<br /><br />This Thursday, February 16th, I will be giving a lecture and slide presentation at the South End Historical Society titled "South End History: An Overview." This will be at 6pm at 532 Massachusetts Avenue, the Historical Society's headquarters.<br /><br />I'll talk about the South End's made-land and architecture as well as the people who have made the South End their home through the last 160 years.<br /><br />I'll be repeating this talk the following Thursday, February 23rd, at 12:15pm at the Old South Meeting House, corner of Milk and Washington Streets, for the "Middays at the Meeting House" lecture series.*<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Reservations are required for both events. Please call 617-536-4445 or email <a href="mailto:admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org">admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org</a> to sign up. </span><br /><br />*The Old South Meeting House lecture on the 23rd is $6 for non-SEHS members and free for SEHS members. The lecture at the SEHS on the 16th is free of charge.Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-39966016674320960222012-02-06T10:37:00.015-05:002012-02-09T21:11:44.217-05:00The Army Recruiting StationAbout a month ago, I received this tweet from a South End resident:<br /><br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_7TANQvpMwE/Ty_0y9HSv9I/AAAAAAAAAMw/n2PkWAGUs-c/s1600/Grandpa.JPG"><img style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; width: 300px; height: 79px;" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_7TANQvpMwE/Ty_0y9HSv9I/AAAAAAAAAMw/n2PkWAGUs-c/s400/Grandpa.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5706048409137496018" border="0" /></a>I exchanged emails with this curious South Ender and, as the message above indicates, his grandfather enlisted in the Army at the recruiting station at the corner of Columbus Avenue and Clarendon Street in 1941. The South Ender asked if we had any information about the station or any photographs of what it looked like. I told him that I didn't think the Historical Society had anything but that I'd do a bit of digging in other Boston area resources and would see what I could find.<br /><br />I started hunting around for information about the Army induction station and for the South Ender's grandfather. I found that throughout the course of World War II, the Army had several different induction stations in Boston, depending on the volume of recruits or draftees and the proximity to a railroad station. In January 1941 and for some time before that (I'm not sure how long), new enlistees went to 176 Federal Street. However, a Daily Boston Globe article from February 1941 mentions "Boston's new draft induction station on Columbus Ave" and one from July 1941 gives 269 Columbus Avenue as the address. In February 1941, shortly after the Columbus Ave station opened, the Globe reported that the station was expanding into the adjacent Earle Building because they needed more space(1).<br /><br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-drnUZYRKI7g/TzALA1oMqwI/AAAAAAAAAM8/6BL70zWvmNM/s1600/285-333%2Bcol.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 280px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-drnUZYRKI7g/TzALA1oMqwI/AAAAAAAAAM8/6BL70zWvmNM/s400/285-333%2Bcol.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5706072836902005506" border="0" /></a>As soon as I saw the name "Earle Building," I knew exactly where the induction station was. So do you. Have you ever been to the CVS at the corner of Clarendon and Columbus? Or to the City Year headquarters? Did you go to the South End Lower Roxbury Open Space Land Trust's art reception after the 2011 Garden tour? That building. The image at left is a picture of the building in 1972 (image courtesy of the South End Historical Society). So the next time you're in there, think of the thousands of recruits who went through there before being sent to Fort Devens or Camp Edwards for training. The "men reporting were given two meals by special ticket at a nearby cafeteria" and some or all took the train from Huntington Avenue(2). <a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HL9d5FskgUI/TzLL3wV38vI/AAAAAAAAANg/tlyr-sGzXmY/s1600/Huntington%2BAve.JPG"><img style="float:right; margin:0 0 10px 10px;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 338px; height: 330px;" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HL9d5FskgUI/TzLL3wV38vI/AAAAAAAAANg/tlyr-sGzXmY/s400/Huntington%2BAve.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5706847836561732338" border="0" /></a>I wish I knew where the men ate and I assume that many departed from the Huntington Avenue railroad station that used to stand where Copley Place is now. The Huntington Ave. Station is circled in the 1938 Bromley map at right.<br /><br />Now that I knew where the South Ender's grandfather enlisted, I searched to see if I could find any record of him. Newspapers often reported who enlisted or reported and where they were from. I didn't find a mention of him in the newspaper but I did find his enlistment record, which listed his date, occupation, age, birthday, and level of education. He enlisted in early 1942.<br /><br />When he enlisted, he probably saw ads like the one below from October 1942, encouraging him to serve his country.<span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-shDsHJY__5E/TzR8NIaSHAI/AAAAAAAAAOQ/HIiTKYDVz2Y/s1600/One%2Bfor%2Ball%2B10.26.1942.JPG"><img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 321px; height: 311px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-shDsHJY__5E/TzR8NIaSHAI/AAAAAAAAAOQ/HIiTKYDVz2Y/s400/One%2Bfor%2Ball%2B10.26.1942.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5707323192823127042" border="0" /></a><br /></span>Or this one from June 1942.<a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kEKkqibmhdM/TzLPRZ_X5xI/AAAAAAAAAN4/eRVWLETE484/s1600/Life%2B6.8.1942.jpg"><img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 381px; height: 329px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kEKkqibmhdM/TzLPRZ_X5xI/AAAAAAAAAN4/eRVWLETE484/s400/Life%2B6.8.1942.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5706851575773259538" border="0" /></a>If you know anyone who went through the South End induction station, please let me know. This is the first time I'd heard a story relating to it.<br /><br />1. <span style="font-style: italic;"></span><span style="font-style: italic;">Daily Boston Globe, </span>February 8, 1941, July 8, 1941, and February 22, 1941.<br /><br />2. <span style="font-style: italic;">Daily Boston Globe, </span>February 7, 1941.Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-10716877026957728262012-01-24T08:14:00.011-05:002012-01-24T08:42:14.624-05:00A South End Love StoryOne morning a few weeks ago, I received an unusual phone call.<span style=""> </span>I receive a lot of inquiries from people asking about a specific South End building, block, family, organization, etc.<span style=""> </span>But this call was different.<br /><p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xFqDeluSQlo/Tx6vlGvgHCI/AAAAAAAAALw/OcRUI3jLaGY/s1600/img430.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 294px; height: 400px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xFqDeluSQlo/Tx6vlGvgHCI/AAAAAAAAALw/OcRUI3jLaGY/s400/img430.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5701187230297496610" border="0" /></a>Caller: “Good morning.<span style=""> </span>I have an unusual question.<span style=""> </span>In 1972 I attended an event that the South End Historical Society held.<span style=""> </span>It was a Ball at the Back Bay railroad station.<span style=""> </span>Do you know the date that the Ball was held that year?”<br /></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Me: “I’m not sure, but I can find out.<span style=""> </span>May I ask why?”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Caller: “I met my husband there.<span style=""> </span>This year marks the 40<sup>th</sup> anniversary of that date.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Me: “May I have your name?”<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-UvqN45r-OO4/Tx6xstBeRnI/AAAAAAAAAMU/z3Fm2CeKgpQ/s1600/Lael%2B1972%2BGlobe%2BJan%2B29%2B1972.jpg"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 355px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-UvqN45r-OO4/Tx6xstBeRnI/AAAAAAAAAMU/z3Fm2CeKgpQ/s400/Lael%2B1972%2BGlobe%2BJan%2B29%2B1972.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5701189559855761010" border="0" /></a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Caller: “My name is Lael Montgomery.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I told her I’d search and call her back.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">I went into our archives and, surprisingly, found one copy of the 1972 Ball invitation (at left and above). The date: January 28<sup>th</sup>, 1972.<span style=""> </span>I hadn’t expected to find one.<span style=""> </span>We’ve held forty-five balls and we don’t have invitations saved from many of those years.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">We have a few pictures from our balls but nothing from 1972.<span style=""> </span>However, I knew that sometimes the <i>Boston Globe</i> wrote articles about our early balls.<span style=""> </span>Knowing it would be a long shot, I looked for any reports of the 1972 ball in old issues of the <i>Globe</i>.<span style=""> </span>And, to my astonishment, I found an article about the ball with a large picture of three women.<span style=""> </span>The caption reads: “BUBBLY AT THE BALL: Janet Chute, Catherine Hinds, and Lael Montgomery (left to right) celebrate at the South End Historical Society ball at the Back Bay railroad station last night.” (See image above right).<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">I called her back and told her I found the invitation, which I scanned and sent her a copy of, and a <i>Globe </i>article with her picture on it.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6H5O3LUBrT4/Tx6xAR7E-6I/AAAAAAAAAMI/dW5mCoXa4pU/s1600/1973%2BBack%2BBay%2Bstation.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 255px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6H5O3LUBrT4/Tx6xAR7E-6I/AAAAAAAAAMI/dW5mCoXa4pU/s400/1973%2BBack%2BBay%2Bstation.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5701188796666936226" border="0" /></a>Lael replied, “I remember that article; my father called me the next morning and asked me if I had seen the <i>Globe </i>yet.”<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">We chatted a bit about the event and about the transportation.<span style=""> </span>Many of the guests, Lael included, took the train from downtown Boston into Back Bay station, where they disembarked (Back Bay station image at left, 1973, courtesy of Richard Card, South End Historical Society<span style="">). </span>Some dressed to match the ball’s Victorian theme.<span style=""> </span>Other passengers, on their way through Back Bay station, must have been astonished to see the ball attendees on the train cars, headed to a dinner and dance.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Lael sent me a picture (see below- Lael and husband Jon), and a few days later, she emailed me to let me know that they celebrated both their 40<sup>th</sup> anniversary of meeting and her birthday with a party, complete with centerpieces of enlarged 1972 ball invitations.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RfCc6Mgg7f4/Tx6yTCBX8pI/AAAAAAAAAMg/yheGNik61fA/s1600/Lael%2526JonPopulo.JPG"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 300px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RfCc6Mgg7f4/Tx6yTCBX8pI/AAAAAAAAAMg/yheGNik61fA/s400/Lael%2526JonPopulo.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5701190218327519890" border="0" /></a>So happy anniversary of meeting to Jon and Lael!<span style=""> </span>I’m glad that our 1972 ball (and our 6<sup>th</sup>, I believe) holds such a special place in your hearts!</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Our 46<sup>th</sup> annual ball will take place on Saturday, April 28<sup>th</sup>, at the Lenox Hotel, corner of Exeter and Boylston Streets.<span style=""> </span>At this “Venetian Masquerade,” guests are encouraged to don masks.<span style=""> </span>Along with food, drink, dancing, and our silent auction, we will award prizes to those with the most beautiful, unique, and creative masks.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style=""> </span></p>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-66729728366732198522012-01-19T10:07:00.008-05:002012-01-19T11:16:07.010-05:00The Murder of Harry Hamberg<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9YBHHx9R85g/TxgyMceo1EI/AAAAAAAAAKc/eFQnqM13sUQ/s1600/Harry%2BHamburg.JPG"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 261px; height: 278px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9YBHHx9R85g/TxgyMceo1EI/AAAAAAAAAKc/eFQnqM13sUQ/s400/Harry%2BHamburg.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5699360517821879362" border="0" /></a>Harry Hamberg, South End Tailor (image at left from <span style="font-style: italic;">Boston Daily Globe, </span>January 1, 1925).<p class="MsoNormal">On the evening of December 31, 1924, two men entered Harry Hamberg’s tailor and second-hand clothing shop at 358 Shawmut Avenue.<span style=""> </span>They planned to commit robbery.<span style=""> </span>When they entered, Harry attempted to rise but one of the men struck him in the head with a revolver, knocking him back.<span style=""> </span>Yelling, Harry tried to get up and the same robber shot him in the mouth, fatally wounding him.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">William Kendricks and Claude Townsel of 15 East Brookline Street and Emil Hudson of 7 Fairweather Street were in the lunch room next door to Harry’s tailor shop.<span style=""> </span>Upon hearing Harry’s screams, they ran from the lunch room to the tailor shop and reached the door as the two criminals emerged.<span style=""> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 0.5in;"> “One of the men pointed a pistol at the trio and told them to get back into the lunch room.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 1in;">‘Move quick!<span style=""> </span>Get back where you came from or you’ll die too’,” yelled the gunman.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 0.5in;">“Still covering the three men with the pistol the bandit, reinforced by his companion, followed the men back to the lunch room and then warned them not to come out for several minutes because…he would shoot.”<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[1]</span></span></a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The thieves fled toward West Dedham Street, chased by people who had been attracted to the scene by Harry’s screams.<span style=""> </span>The convicts turned onto Newland Street, where the pursuers lost their trail.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-EJxWiN66Tug/Txgyte6pABI/AAAAAAAAAKo/W3FM58zF1aY/s1600/Tailor%2BShop.JPG"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 379px; height: 253px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-EJxWiN66Tug/Txgyte6pABI/AAAAAAAAAKo/W3FM58zF1aY/s400/Tailor%2BShop.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5699361085411885074" border="0" /></a>Meanwhile, Harry “staggered from his store and into the street, where he collapsed.”<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn2" name="_ftnref2" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[2]</span></span></a><span style=""> </span>Passersby transported him to a nearby butcher shop, where the police found him, still alive, a few minutes later.<span style=""> </span>He deteriorated rapidly and could not speak to the police. <span style=""> </span>An ambulance brought Harry to nearby Boston City Hospital, where he died shortly after arriving. The image at right, from the <span style="font-style: italic;">Boston Daily Globe</span> on January 1, 1925, shows Harry's tailor shop and secondhand clothing shop.<span style=""> </span><span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NDe01uH5_PY/Txg07w6-QhI/AAAAAAAAAK0/Cd7-HuUvK4A/s1600/Henry%2BAlexander.JPG"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 142px; height: 157px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NDe01uH5_PY/Txg07w6-QhI/AAAAAAAAAK0/Cd7-HuUvK4A/s400/Henry%2BAlexander.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5699363529786540562" border="0" /></a>At 2:30 am on January 10<sup>th</sup>, 1925, following “clews,” police arrested sixteen-year-old Henry Alexander of 6 ½ Arnold Street (image at left, <span style="font-style: italic;">Boston Daily Globe</span>, January 11, 1925), Roxbury, for the murder of Harry Hamberg and for the robbery of Manuel Oumanian at 333 Shawmut Avenue a few days before Mr. Hamberg’s murder.<span style=""> </span>Henry Alexander confessed to the robbery at Mr. Hamberg’s but claimed that his partner, Frank Kearney, fired the gun.<span style=""> </span>Henry pled guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to 19 to 20 years in prison.<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn3" name="_ftnref3" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[3]</span></span></a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Henry Alexander’s partner in crime, the man who shot Harry Hamberg, eluded authorities until 1941, when authorities captured him near the Mexican border.<span style=""> </span>Frank Kearney managed to avoid arrest for seventeen years and his “travels took him to many parts of the world, including Europe, South America, and Mexico.<span style=""> </span>He left France at the outbreak of the war [World War II].”<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn4" name="_ftnref4" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[4]</span></span></a><span style=""> </span>Kearney claimed that during the robbery of Harry Hamberg’s shop, the “revolver accidentally discharged when he struck the victim on the head.”<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn5" name="_ftnref5" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[5]</span></span></a><span style=""> </span>Kearney was sentenced to 28 to 30 years in prison for manslaughter.<span><span><a style="" href="post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn3" name="_ftnref3" title=""></a></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">At the time of his murder, Harry was 63 years old and lived at 30 Emerald Street with his wife, children, and an occasional boarder.<span style=""> </span>Emerald Street was located in the Castle Square area and ran between Dover (now East Berkeley) and Castle (now Herald) Streets.<span style=""> </span>The 1922 Bromley maps below indicate Emerald Street’s location. The arrow indicates 30 Emerald Street.<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Kn2k74DPwS0/TxhBOnfU52I/AAAAAAAAALY/RuDpkAiS14k/s1600/30%2BEmerald%2B1922.JPG"><img style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; width: 457px; height: 359px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Kn2k74DPwS0/TxhBOnfU52I/AAAAAAAAALY/RuDpkAiS14k/s400/30%2BEmerald%2B1922.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5699377047811712866" border="0" /><span><span><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0XYarAeB7qM/TxhBg23TOTI/AAAAAAAAALk/aF0FbBL3oP4/s1600/Emerald%2BLarge.JPG"><img style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; width: 458px; height: 341px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0XYarAeB7qM/TxhBg23TOTI/AAAAAAAAALk/aF0FbBL3oP4/s400/Emerald%2BLarge.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5699377361176443186" border="0" /></a></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal">Harry and his wife Ida came to the United States from Russia in 1908 with three children: Benjamin, born in 1893; Dora, born in 1894; and Samuel, born in 1897.<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn6" name="_ftnref6" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[6]</span></span></a><span style=""> </span>Dora married Samuel Katz, who lived in the Castle Square area and at one time had a shop at 488 Tremont Street.<span style=""> </span>The 1930 census shows that Dora and Samuel Katz lived at 30 Emerald Street with their children, Arnold, Shirley, and Leon, as well as Dora’s mother and Harry’s widow Ida and Dora’s nephew Morris Hamburg.</p> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"> <a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[1]</span></span></a> “Tailor Shot to Death in South End Holdup,” <i>Boston Daily Globe, </i>January 1, 1925.</p><div style=""><div style="" id="ftn2"><p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref2" name="_ftn2" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[2]</span></span></a> Ibid.<span style=""> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn3"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref3" name="_ftn3" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[3]</span></span></a> “Roxbury Boy Accuses Pal in South End Murder Case,” <i>Boston Daily Globe, </i>January 10, 1925 and “Guilty of Manslaughter,” <i>Boston Daily Globe, </i>May 26, 1925.<span style=""> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn4"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref4" name="_ftn4" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[4]</span></span></a> “Boston Slayer Suspect Back after Seventeen Years,” <i>Daily Boston Globe</i>, August 19, 1941.<span style=""> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn5"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref5" name="_ftn5" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[5]</span></span></a> Ibid.<span style=""> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn6"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref6" name="_ftn6" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style="">[6]</span></span></a> United States Federal Census, 1930.<span style=""> </span></p> </div> </div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-76076648044132589712012-01-04T09:44:00.027-05:002012-01-04T12:40:57.066-05:00Some South End ImagesSometimes I get sidetracked when I look through our collections here at the <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/">South End Historical Society (SEHS)</a>. I go searching for one thing and end up, three hours later, twenty-five topics in the opposite direction and having completely forgotten what it was I went looking for in the first place. One interesting thing leads to another and so on and so on.<br /><br />For your visual enjoyment on this icy Wednesday, here are some images that we hold in our collections. All of these images are courtesy of the SEHS.<br /><br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-Ju27FCmqE/TwRmtZ4tlkI/AAAAAAAAAHw/MMt1sBAMPd4/s1600/img417.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 162px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-Ju27FCmqE/TwRmtZ4tlkI/AAAAAAAAAHw/MMt1sBAMPd4/s400/img417.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693788759132051010" border="0" /></a>Rather belatedly, to the left is a Hallmark Christmas card (opened and laid flat) dating from 1934. The "Merry Christmas" portion is the front of the card. This was recently donated to us as a part of a large object and photograph collection from a South End family. This collection was found in a South End house.<br /><br />You're probably wondering why I posted the book mark at the bottom right. It depicts the Bunker Hill Monument, far from the South End. However, the maker of this book mark, Poole Pianos, was located at 5 and 7 Appleton Street in the South End. The back of this card reads:<br /><br /><div style="text-align: center;">The<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DCq4kuUhWH4/TwRnhz_qMkI/AAAAAAAAAII/moNI6bykuW4/s1600/img418.jpg"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 152px; height: 410px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DCq4kuUhWH4/TwRnhz_qMkI/AAAAAAAAAII/moNI6bykuW4/s400/img418.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693789659493708354" border="0" /></a><br />"Poole"<br />Piano<br />embodies all piano excellences,<br />and has attained the highest level<br />possible in the art of piano making.<br /><br />Unexcelled for<br />Tone,<br />Action,<br />Design and<br />Durability.<br /><br />The "Poole" is the best piano possible for a customer to buy.<br /><br />Poole Piano Co.<br />5 and 7 Appleton Street<br />Boston, MA<br /><br />For Sale By<br />J.E. Lothrop Piano Co.,<br />Dover N.H.<div style="text-align: left;"><br />This book mark probably dates to the very end of the nineteenth or early twentieth century.<br /><br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DdXBB_15yF4/TwRqUbMMIII/AAAAAAAAAIU/SO0zC0tqmV0/s1600/img422.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 231px; height: 370px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DdXBB_15yF4/TwRqUbMMIII/AAAAAAAAAIU/SO0zC0tqmV0/s400/img422.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693792728031961218" border="0" /></a>The object at the left is a business card for W. W. Stall. The back of this card reads:<br /><br /><div style="text-align: center;">W.W. Stall,<br />All Kinds New and Second-Hand<br />SAFETY BICYCLES,<br />Bought, Sold, and Exchanged<br />Odd Fellows' Hall, 509 Tremont Street., 4 Warren Ave.,<br />Boston, Mass.<br />Repairing A Specialty.<br /> Telephone, Tremont 263.<br /><br /><div style="text-align: left;">W.W. Stall was located in Odd Fellows' Hall, which burned in 1932 (Atelier 505 stands in the location today).* Stall was a prominent athlete in the cycling world of New England and the mid-Atlantic states. W.W. Stall began business at 509 Tremont St. by 1885 (possibly earlier). The <a href="http://brooklinehistory.blogspot.com/2009/07/wheelmen-take-corey-hill-challenge.html">Brookline History blog ran a great article</a><a href="http://brooklinehistory.blogspot.com/2009/07/wheelmen-take-corey-hill-challenge.html"> about the Corey Hill Bicycle challenge</a>, which Stall participated in.<br /><br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VWANSxVoU4w/TwSEAHgXeEI/AAAAAAAAAJo/9PJFFyRSL_M/s1600/Parker%2BMemorial%2Bpostcard.JPG"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 400px; height: 343px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VWANSxVoU4w/TwSEAHgXeEI/AAAAAAAAAJo/9PJFFyRSL_M/s400/Parker%2BMemorial%2Bpostcard.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693820966452820034" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The image at right is a scan of a postcard. The postcard dates to 1918 and depicts Theodore Parker Memorial Hall at the corner of Appleton and Berkeley Streets. Built between 1872 and 1873, it housed the Twenty-Eighth Congregational Society (actually Unitarian) and the Parker Fraternity, a community social organization, and was named in honor of leader Theodore Parker, who died in 1860. The church later moved but the Fraternity stayed until around World War I. Through the mid twentieth century it housed many organizations, including the Worcester County Creamery, a book store, the British Naval and Military Veteran's Association, Magna Film Productions, and the Boston Tea Party dance hall. A fire damaged the building in 1972 and in 1975 it was converted to residential and commercial use.[1]<br /><br />The image below shows two unidentified women at the intersection of Dover, Tremont, and Berkeley Streets, again near the present day Atelier building.* The image was taken in the 1890s.<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9AvSqYoZVKQ/TwSJdFvh6oI/AAAAAAAAAKA/9CV0i9ONi-0/s1600/tremont%2Bst.%2Bc.1890%2527s.jpg"><img style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; width: 305px; height: 400px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9AvSqYoZVKQ/TwSJdFvh6oI/AAAAAAAAAKA/9CV0i9ONi-0/s400/tremont%2Bst.%2Bc.1890%2527s.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693826961753893506" border="0" /></a>I find the Historical Society's own institutional history very interesting. The image below contains two of our House Tour brochures. The white brochure is the first ever House Tour brochure from 1967. We still hold our South End House Tour and this past October we hosted our 43rd. The event has changed quite a bit from the beginning, especially the guidebook. The red brochure is from our most recent House Tour on October 15, 2011.<br /><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-e0AceB-4UUw/TwR9PFF2Q0I/AAAAAAAAAI4/HSfiabtZUlM/s1600/img416.jpg"><img style="margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 256px; height: 254px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-e0AceB-4UUw/TwR9PFF2Q0I/AAAAAAAAAI4/HSfiabtZUlM/s400/img416.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693813526921364290" border="0" /></a><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Vrm6k9rzUE8/TwR9wYHAO1I/AAAAAAAAAJQ/BC9Y37-0rYs/s1600/SEHS%2B2011%2Bguidebook.jpg"><img style="margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 262px; height: 277px;" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Vrm6k9rzUE8/TwR9wYHAO1I/AAAAAAAAAJQ/BC9Y37-0rYs/s400/SEHS%2B2011%2Bguidebook.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693814098962168658" border="0" /></a><br /><div style="text-align: left;">*See this 1890 Bromley map for a bit of context for Odd Fellows' Hall and the surrounding Tremont, Berkeley, Dover area. The Cyclorama (present location of the <a href="http://www.bcaonline.org/">Boston Center for the Arts</a>) is the circular building in the lower center. Odd Fellows' Hall is right above it (east).<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ozzvWl1z31Q/TwSLBlR9njI/AAAAAAAAAKM/Z4Opb-txw64/s1600/1890%2Batlas%2BSouth%2BEnd.JPG"><img style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; width: 291px; height: 400px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ozzvWl1z31Q/TwSLBlR9njI/AAAAAAAAAKM/Z4Opb-txw64/s400/1890%2Batlas%2BSouth%2BEnd.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5693828688206732850" border="0" /></a>**These images are courtesy of the <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/">South End Historical Society</a>. If you are interested in reproducing any of these images, please contact the SEHS by calling 617-536-4445 or by emailing admin@southendhistoricalsociety.org.<br /><br /><div style="">1. Adapted from former <a href="http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/">South End Historical Society</a> President and Historian Richard Card's article, <span style="font-style: italic;">The Parker Memorial</span>.<br /></div><br /></div></div></div></div></div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-10124311558527399372011-12-27T21:05:00.000-05:002011-12-27T22:48:38.105-05:00Why is Castle Square called Castle Square?After reading my recent post about Christmas and the South End, a reader of my <a href="http://southend.patch.com/">South End Patch</a> blog asked “how did Castle Sq get its name? Was it named after something or someone?” <p class="MsoNormal">When I read the question yesterday afternoon, I had no idea why it was called Castle Square.<span style=""> </span>The only thing I knew was that Castle Square Hotel and Castle Square Theatre were located on one corner of the intersection of Ferdinand (now Arlington), Tremont, West Castle (now Herald), and Chandler Streets.<span style=""> The</span> hotel and the theatre stood on most of the Berkeley, Chandler, and Tremont Street block from the late nineteenth century until 1933, when they were demolished.<span style=""> </span>The Chandler Inn is all that remains of the old complex.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NmhkxwwiM40/TvqRPYvIFGI/AAAAAAAAAHU/3FqiLL6_vxQ/s1600/Map%2B2.png"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 235px; height: 288px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NmhkxwwiM40/TvqRPYvIFGI/AAAAAAAAAHU/3FqiLL6_vxQ/s400/Map%2B2.png" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5691020772660221026" border="0" /></a>Since the first mention of anything “castle” that I knew of in that area was West Castle Street, I looked at some old maps and city directories to try and find when that street name first appeared.<span style=""> </span>West Castle Street was the name of what is now Herald Street, but only the section that runs north west from Washington Street.<span style=""> </span>An 1874 ward map confirms this.<span style=""> </span>Ward maps from 1857 and 1865 list a West Castle Street, north west of Washington, and an East Castle Street, south east of Washington Street.<span style=""> </span>Sometime between 1874 and 1883, the names of the streets change from West and East Castle Streets to Castle and Motte Streets, respectively.<span style=""> </span>The 1885 map from King's Handbook of Boston (at left) shows Castle and Motte Streets. The orange arrow points to Castle Street and the gold star marks the location of the Castle Square Hotel and Theatre. Ward maps until at least 1938 label the streets as Castle and Motte Streets.<span style=""> </span>The first mention of Herald Street I found was in a 1952 newspaper article, so sometime between 1938 and 1952, Castle and Motte Streets became Herald Street.<span style=""> </span>In the mid-1960s, buildings near Herald, Paul, Albion, Village, Emerald, and Middlesex streets were razed.<span style=""> </span>The Castle Square housing complex was then built on the site.<span style=""> </span>I assume that the 1960s Castle Square project was named Castle Square because of the former hotel and theatre nearby and/or the former name of Herald Street.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">So the street was named Castle Street and the hotel and theatre were named Castle Square.<span style=""> </span>I assume that this is where the name of the current Castle Square housing complex comes from.<span style=""> </span>But why did those nineteenth century Bostonians use the name “castle” for the hotel, the theatre, and the street in the first place?<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">As most South Enders and Bostonians probably know, the intersection of East Berkeley (formerly Dover) and Washington Streets marks the approximate location of the narrowest part of the Boston Neck, the thin piece of land connecting Boston’s Shawmut Peninsula with the mainland.<span style=""> </span>Early colonial Bostonians built fortifications on the Neck as early as the mid-seventeenth century.<span style=""> </span>A map from 1775 shows a fortification on the Neck and a short street or path along its border labeled Castle Street.<span style=""> </span>The Hale map from 1814 shows a Castle Street in the same location, near the edge of where the late eighteenth century fortification was located.<span style=""> </span>The nineteenth and twentieth century pre-Herald street Castle Street sits along this same late eighteenth and early nineteenth century Castle Street.<span style=""> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">I cannot be one hundred percent sure why early Bostonians named it Castle Street, but I think it may be because sometimes forts were described as castles.<span style=""> </span>Castle Island (a.k.a. Fort Independence) is a good example.<span style=""> </span>So it’s possible that the street took the name Castle Street because it was located along the line of a Boston Neck fortification and the name stuck all the way until the present day. If my speculation contains any truth, the name Castle Square is an interesting descendant<span style=""> of early Boston.<br /></span></p>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-57370098875677490232011-12-25T11:44:00.000-05:002011-12-25T12:17:07.860-05:00Some South End Christmas History<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" ><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3WyYlJ2fI1s/TvdTiFnTxCI/AAAAAAAAAGM/0_jh8emlfnA/s1600/IMG_1087.JPG"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 320px; height: 240px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3WyYlJ2fI1s/TvdTiFnTxCI/AAAAAAAAAGM/0_jh8emlfnA/s320/IMG_1087.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5690108499293619234" border="0" /></a>I’m sitting at my mom’s dining room table in my hometown of Lake Placid, NY, drinking a cup of coffee with eggnog.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >I’m surrounded by half-used roll</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >s of wrapping paper, curling ribbon, and gift bows.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >We spent</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > yesterday preparing for today- running last minute gift errands, cleaning, cooking, and wrapping a pile of presents.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >My mom made her traditional Christmas Eve supper-a giant pot of chicken and dumplings and homemade hot chocolate.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >The tree sits in the living room, the stockings hang from the windows, and the dogs Arlo (in the picture on the right) and Ayla (laying on the floor behind him) wait for the homemade biscuits they know await them.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >Later today when our extended family arrives, we’ll have a big turkey dinner, open presents, and maybe fall asleep in the wrapping paper like Randy from <i style="">The Christmas Story.<span style=""> </span></i>We do t</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >hese same things every year.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >As I thought about the Christmases of my past, I wondered about those of others.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" > </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:100%;" >How did past South Enders celebrate?</span> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:100%;">Many late 19<sup>th</sup> and 20<sup>th</sup> century South Enders lived in impoverished tenement districts.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Charitable organ</span><span style="font-size:100%;">izations attempted to give basic provisions to these penniless families, especially around Christmas time.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">For example, in 1902, the Volunteers of America provided baskets of food for 1,000 South Enders so they could prepare Christmas Day feasts for their families.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Baskets included “roast beef or a turkey, potatoes, onions, squash, pie, fruit and nuts.”</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Volunteers also collected clothing to distribute to destitute families and sponsored a Christmas celebration for children complete with toys, “recitations, singing…moving pictures” candy and nu</span><span style="font-size:100%;">ts.<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[1]</span></span></span></span></a></span><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""></a><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""></a></span><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--4wZbPD-rbw/TvdXNDMLfnI/AAAAAAAAAGk/hVVRUhtbXw4/s1600/IMG_1033.JPG"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 320px; height: 240px;" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--4wZbPD-rbw/TvdXNDMLfnI/AAAAAAAAAGk/hVVRUhtbXw4/s320/IMG_1033.JPG" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5690112535912218226" border="0" /></a><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""></a><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title=""></a></span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:100%;">Numerous other organizations hosted parties for South End children.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">South End settlement houses like the South End House at 20 Union Park, the Lincoln House at 80 Emerald St., and the Hale House at 8 Garland St. hosted festivities lasting throughout the twelve days of Christmas.*</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">In 1913, the Salvation Army held a party for 4,000 children at the People’s Palace on Washington </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Street in the South End.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Boys received “sleds, hockey sticks, roller skates, and express wagons.”</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">In 1936, 1000 South End children between the ages of 5 and 12 enjoyed a Christmas party at the Municipal Building on Shawmut Avenue with a “marionette show…featuring the ‘Adventures of Peter Rabbit’.”<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn2" name="_ftnref2" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[2]</span></span></span></span></a></span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">In 19</span><span style="font-size:100%;">53, children at Ha</span><span style="font-size:100%;">le House made gifts for loved ones.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Especially popular were “smell bags…a sachet bag made of a bit of silk stuffed with cotton shavings and tied with ribbon,” usually given by children to their mothers.<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn3" name="_ftnref3" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[3]</span></span></span></span></a></span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5IakIDXHpck/TvdWh4zJ5II/AAAAAAAAAGY/sAicIiebi_g/s1600/concord.png"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 273px; height: 177px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5IakIDXHpck/TvdWh4zJ5II/AAAAAAAAAGY/sAicIiebi_g/s200/concord.png" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5690111794388526210" border="0" /></a><span style="font-size:100%;">South End churches celebrated Christmas with sermons and seasonal decorations.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">In 1895, “the old, old story of Bethlehem was told” at the Church of the Unity on West Newton Street.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Shawmut Congregational Church on the corner of West Brookline and Tr</span><span style="font-size:100%;">emont</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> Streets was “decorated with spruce trees, palms, lilies and other flowers, and wreaths of holly.”</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Warren Avenue Baptist (until recently Concord Baptist Church-photo at left from 1978) and Tremont Street Methodist (now New Hope Baptist) both featured “particularly good” Christmas music.<a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftn4" name="_ftnref4" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[4]</span></span></span></span></a></span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kGN4YVveO7A/TvdZ33BSw7I/AAAAAAAAAGw/h0aBl9tifII/s1600/123.jpg"><img style="float: left; margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; cursor: pointer; width: 228px; height: 320px;" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kGN4YVveO7A/TvdZ33BSw7I/AAAAAAAAAGw/h0aBl9tifII/s320/123.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5690115470402962354" border="0" /></a><span style="font-size:100%;">Occasionally however, tragedy struck the atmosphere of merriment.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">On Christmas Eve in 1890, a fire between Dover St., Albany St., Waltham St., and Harrison Ave. caused $150,000 in losses for the New England Piano Company, $40,000 in losses for Paul’s Block, took the life of an unidentified man, and injured two firemen.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">In late December 1979, a rooming </span><span style="font-size:100%;">house at 123 West Concord Street (at left, photo from 1972) burned partially, forcing out tenant Maurice LeVine.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Maurice dressed up as Santa Claus for pay and had returned home early that morning from working at a Christmas party.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">After the fire he stayed in a room at the Bradford Hotel, carrying with him w</span><span style="font-size:100%;">hat he managed to grab during the fire- his fiddle and the Santa Claus suit he was wearing from the party.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Not having anything else to do after the fire, he went around to Christmas parties in his smudged Santa suit, playing the fiddle and spreading Christmas cheer. </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:100%;">Whatever you celebrate, I hope you have a wonderful holiday! </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:100%;">*Emerald Street ran through what is now the Castle Square area.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span><span style="font-size:100%;">Garland Street ran between Shawmut and Washington Streets, about halfway in between the present day East Berkeley and Waterford Streets.</span></p><p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:100%;">Images: The image of Concord Baptist Church and the image of 123 West Concord Street are courtesy of The South End Historical Society. The first two images belong to me.<br /></span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="MsoNormal"> </p> <div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"> <hr style="height: 3px;font-size:78%;" width="33%" align="left" > <div style="" id="ftn1"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[1]</span></span></span></span></a> “Noble Work…,” <i style="">Boston Daily Globe, </i>December 26, 1902.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn2"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref2" name="_ftn2" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[2]</span></span></span></span></a> “Christmas Party given 1000 South End Children,” <i style="">Boston Daily Globe, </i>December 23, 1936.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn3"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref3" name="_ftn3" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[3]</span></span></span></span></a> “Believers in Santa Claus,” <i style="">Daily Boston Globe, </i>December 20, 1953.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> </div> <div style="" id="ftn4"> <p class="MsoFootnoteText" style="text-indent: 0.5in;"><span style="font-size:100%;"><a style="" href="http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=6972964519382606043#_ftnref4" name="_ftn4" title=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=""><span class="MsoFootnoteReference"><span style=";font-family:&quot;;" >[4]</span></span></span></span></a> “Story of Bethlehem Told…,” <i style="">Boston Daily Globe</i>, December 23, 1895.</span><span style="font-size:100%;"> </span></p> </div> </div>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6972964519382606043.post-45212313426162075942011-12-20T07:56:00.000-05:002011-12-21T15:27:08.707-05:00About This Blog<a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" style="font-family: georgia;" href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-UkvL9vfZ9RQ/TvCUsorFx2I/AAAAAAAAACc/D4f4UC2fp9c/s1600/1631-1595washington.jpg"><img style="float: right; margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; cursor: pointer; width: 392px; height: 271px;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-UkvL9vfZ9RQ/TvCUsorFx2I/AAAAAAAAACc/D4f4UC2fp9c/s320/1631-1595washington.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5688209823922243426" border="0" /></a><span style="font-family:georgia;">I research and read about Boston's South End almost every day. I started this blog to share information about the history of the South End neighborhood and its relationship to Boston. Bostonians' perceptions of what constitutes the South End have changed considerably over the last two hundred years. After all, the "South" End is a geographical distinction designating the southern portion of the settlement. Before the mid-nineteenth century, the South End was actually what is now the financial district. When people started moving out to the Boston neck and the city started selling lots and filling in land around Washington Street, this new South End (and the South End I'll be talking about) was born.</span><br /><p style="font-family: georgia;" face="georgia">I am not planning on including full scholarly citations for most of my sources. I will provide the basic information so that you can track the source down but, for the purposes of this blog, I'm not going all out Chicago-style.<br /></p><p style="font-family: georgia;">Luckily for me, I work for the South End Historical Society and have access to many of their wonderful resources. While I'll try to limit the philosophizing, any opinions I express are my own and are not necessarily shared by the South End Historical Society. </p><span style="font-family:georgia;">If you use any of the information on this blog for your own research, please give credit where credit is due.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family:georgia;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">The image above belongs to the South End Historical Society. Taken in 1972, it shows the block of 1631 to 1595 Washington Street</span>, aka the Boston Neck. Notice the elevated train on the right side of the image.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family:georgia;">Happy reading!</span><br /><span style="font-family:georgia;"></span>Hope Shannonhttps://plus.google.com/105252769447961115470noreply@blogger.com2